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Graduate Courses

536 Classroom Management Three hours.
This course provides information to help students develop pro-active strategies to manage the classroom environment and student behavior. Emphasis is placed on students’ development of a personal and unique classroom management plan. (May not be taken for graduate credit if taken at undergraduate level.) Link to Syllabus

650 Tests, Measurements, and Evaluations Three hours.
The study of the measurement and evaluation of student learning with both criterion and norm-referenced procedures. (May not be taken for graduate credit if taken at undergraduate level.)  Link to Syllabus

Art Education (ART)
The M.Ed. candidate who wishes to specialize in art must present an artwork portfolio to be reviewed by the graduate art faculty. A positive evaluation is required for admission to the program.

600 Art History I/Walter Anderson Three hours.
In-depth discussion of the life and works of Walter Anderson. Papers and seminar type discussions are required. Research will be conducted through the primary resources of the Walter Anderson Museum.

601 Art History I/Mississippi Coast Artists Three hours.
In-depth discussion of the life and works of Walter Anderson, Dusti Bonge, and George Ohr. Research will be conducted through discussion with primary resources of the Anderson family and viewing of works available through the Anderson Museum, George Ohr Museum, and family archives.

610 Painting Processes and Applications in Education Three hours.
Individual studio work in painting with media process, subject matter, and developmental learning application for art curriculum development.

611 Drawing Processes and Applications in Education Three hours.
Individual studio work in drawing with media process and developmental learning application for art programs.

630 Applied Computer Graphic Design in Art Education: Photoshop Three hours.
Introduction to the application of desktop publishing software, Photoshop. Through practical study of the current Photoshop, this introductory course will provide a solid understanding of the various technical capabilities as it applies to the classroom instruction. From scanning to rendering, the course will cover this most popular software program’s vast capabilities.
Prerequisite: A working computer knowledge.

631 Applied Graphic Design in Art Education: Graphic Illustration Three hours.
Traditional painting and drawing skills will be emphasized as they apply to graphic illustration as visual problem solving. The creative process is explored in depth as the student prepares an illustration from the conceptual thumbnail stage to a finished product.

649 Independent Study Three hours.
Individual research and study under the guidance of a graduate faculty member.

660 Issues and Trends in Art Education Three hours.
A course designed to research recent developments in art education including the aims, philosophies, methods, content, and problems related to the field.

680 Research in Art Education Three hours.
A course designed to help the student plan and carry out a research project. Specific course content will be designed to meet the research needs of the individual student.
Prerequisite: Education 620, Introduction to Research.

690 Art Workshop Three hours.
Special topic courses to be named when offered.

691 Seminar in Art Education: Special topics Three hours.
Selected topics, content, and teaching methods by guest lecturers and graduate faculty.

Biology (BIO)
The department of biological sciences, in support of the Master of Education degree, offers a graduate curriculum that provides students with an in-depth study of the areas of environmental biology and molecular biology. Courses emphasize the current state of knowledge and theory within these fields, as well as methods of translating this information into classroom-friendly forms. M.Ed. candidates intending to specialize in biology should have a strong background in the discipline.

The student's undergraduate coursework should include such areas as ecology, botany, zoology, genetics, cell biology, and/or vertebrate biology. Graduate classes in biology are typically offered on a rotation; academic advisors will assist each student in the timely completion of the degree.

531 Ichthyology Four hours.
An introduction to the study of fishes. This course covers the anatomy, physiology, ecology, and evolutionary relationships of these vertebrates. A one semester laboratory/field/collection experience is included.

532 Herpetology Four hours.
An introduction to the anatomy, physiology, ecology, and evolutionary relationships of amphibians and reptiles. A one semester hour laboratory/field/collection experience is included.

601 Applications of the Scientific Method Three hours.
An introduction to the philosophy and practice of the scientific method, with applications to teaching science. Analysis of the current scientific literature will be emphasized in this course.

602 Systematics Three hours.
A survey of the historical and modern classification of organisms into groups based on their phylogenetic relationships.

610 Environmental Impacts Three hours.
A study of environments impacted by human activities. Methods that federal and state governments employ to regulate these impacts and options for restricting the long term impact of these environmental changes are covered.

611 Microbial Ecology Three hours.
A survey of current topics in microbial ecology, including microbial diversity, microbial interactions within communities, and microbe-mediated nutrient cycling in the biosphere.

612 Recombinant DNA and Society Three hours.
A course exploring the history, development, and impact of recombinant DNA technologies on society. Current applications of recombinant DNA technology will be examined.

620 Biology of Endangered Species Four hours.
The biology of populations impacted by human-induced changes to environments. The design and implementation of long-term management practices are discussed. A one semester-hour lab which includes trips to visit managed populations is included.

625 PCR Theory and Applications Four hours.
A course exploring the theoretical and practical aspects of PCR, including current methods and their applications. A one semester-hour lab is included.

630 Population and Community Ecology Four hours.
A survey of the important concepts and theories in population and community ecology. Methods of collecting and analyzing data are presented. A one semester-hour lab that includes field trips and data collection is included.

635 Genomics Four hours.
A survey of current concepts and methods in genomics and bioinformatics. Analysis of recent and ongoing public genomics projects will be an integral part of the course. Special attention will be given to current research on the human genome. A one semester-hour lab is included.

640 Animal Behavior Four hours.
A survey of the field of anima1 behavior with emphasis on proximate/ultimate causes, predator-prey interactions, social interactions, foraging, migration, and parental care. A one semester-hour lab which includes data collection and analysis is included.

645 Proteomics Four hours.
An introduction to the concepts and methods of proteomics. Analysis of recent and ongoing public proteomics projects will be an integral part of the course. A one semester-hour lab is included.

650 Mississippi Flora Four hours.
A survey of both natural and introduced plants found in Mississippi. The habitat requirements of various plant species and keys used to identify plants are covered. A one semester-hour lab involving field trips to natural areas is included.

698 Proposal Preparation and literature Research Three hours.
This course requires that a student complete a research proposal that includes a review of relevant literature.

699 Thesis Research Three hours.
This course requires that a student complete a research project and complete a thesis.

Education (EDU)

572 Survey of Exceptional Children Three hours.
A study of exceptionalities from the gifted to the profoundly handicapped. This course is a prerequisite for the mildly/moderately disabled concentration. (May not be taken for graduate credit if course was taken at undergraduate level.) Link to Syllabus

574 Reading in the Middle and Secondary School Three hours.
The development of reading skills in the content areas. Emphasis on helping the middle and secondary school student read more effectively. (May not be taken for graduate credit if course was taken at undergraduate level.) Link to Syllabus

601 Social Studies in the Elementary School Three hours.
The study of research and techniques for teaching social studies as an integrated approach is emphasized. Link to Syllabus

602 Trends in Children’s literature Three hours.
A survey of children's literature and current techniques for using literature in all areas of the curriculum.  Link to Syllabus

603 Seminar in Early Childhood Education Three hours.
A study of curricula trends and issues in early childhood education. Emphasis is placed on developmentally appropriate curriculum and practice, current research, and organization and evaluation of learning experiences for the young child.

606 Integration of Content Curriculum Three hours.
Components from social studies, science and mathematics in the elementary school will be included. Integrating each of these subjects through discovery, hands-on experiences and problem-solving is emphasized. The scope and sequence of the elementary curriculum is examined with an emphasis placed on the development of concepts and generalizations appropriate for the elementary child. Prerequisite: EDU 640. Link to Syllabus

607 Elementary School Mathematics Three hours.
A study of current research and methodology for teaching mathematics in the elementary school. Emphasis is placed on incorporating current NCTM standards in the classroom.  Link to Syllabus

608 Multiple Intelligences Three hours.
An examination of the theories of multiple intelligences, brain-based learning, and learning styles. The influence of these theories on the concepts of creativity, metacognition, and critical thinking is applied to classroom practice.  Link to Syllabus

609 Science in the Elementary School Three hours.
Trends, innovations, and research for teaching life science and physical science in the elementary school are explored.                   Link to Syllabus

611 Current Trends in Reading Three hours.
Current research related to the effective teaching of reading in the elementary school is explored. Link to Syllabus

615 language Arts in the Elementary School Three hours.
The development of communication skills and concepts is explored through research and practical experiences. Link to Syllabus

616 Art in the Elementary School Three hours.
Art activities and materials which stimulate thought processes and development of children from one stage of growth to another. The analysis of successful teaching activities and ways relationships between art and other subjects within the school curriculum are explored.  Link to Syllabus

617 Multicultural Education Three hours.
An examination of strategies and resources for teaching students of diverse cultural backgrounds. The development of units and activities exploring multicultural topics is required.  Link to Syllabus

620 Teacher as Researcher Three hours.
The study of methodology and interpretation of educational research which acquaints the student with various techniques of research and the use in educational endeavors.  Link to Syllabus

621 Theories of learning Three hours.
An in-depth study of learning theories, cognitive development, and current topics related to appropriate educational classroom practice. Same as PSY 621. This class may be online enhanced.  Link to Syllabus

625 Technology in Education Three hours.
A study of the use of computers and other technology in the classroom. The student is given hands-on experiences using technology including understanding of the Internet. This class may be online enhanced. Link to Syllabus

626 Cooperative learning Three hours.
A study of various forms of cooperative learning structures that can be implemented in all curriculum areas.  Link to Syllabus

627 Performance Assessment Three hours.
This course will examine theory, practice, and strategies related to assessing student achievement in the contemporary classroom. This class may be online enhanced.  Link to Syllabus

630 Historical and Philosophical Foundations of Education Three hours.
This course is a survey of the development of educational systems and philosophies from ancient times to the present.                   Link to Syllabus

635 Internship Six hours in increments of two.
Students will be supervised by a university faculty member in an accredited school where they are employed. Students are required to attend scheduled seminars which will include research and discussion on current educational issues related to the classroom teacher. The internship will last for a full academic year, with students entering in the fall trimester and continuing the internship in cohort groups through the spring trimester. Link to Syllabus Hattiesburg

636 Reading and Writing Across the Curriculum Three hours.
An introduction to specific principles and practices of integrating reading/writing across the curriculum with emphasis placed upon an awareness of balancing the process and the product, strategies for using the approach and assessment. This class may be online enhanced.

637 Advanced Diagnosis of Reading and Writing Difficulties Three hours.
This course provides specific knowledge in the assessment of the reading and writing abilities of elementary students. An emphasis is placed on the various causal factors which might inhibit the student’s developmental processes of learning to read and write effectively and strategically, and an understanding of these factors might enable a teacher to develop and implement a program of prescriptive instruction. This class may be online enhanced.

640 Curricula Planning Three hours.
A survey of general curriculum development with emphasis on current practices in curriculum design and organization, evaluation, curriculum materials, and curriculum development including instructional objectives.

642 Home-School-Community Relations: Working With Parents Three hours.
Current research regarding parent involvement programs, parent education, parent-teacher conferences, using community resources, and current topics are explored.

646 Secondary Methods Three hours.
An in-depth study of current management, instructional and evaluation processes and practices within secondary schools. Methods and problems related to teaching and learning in the student’s major field will be emphasized.

651 The Gifted Child* Three hours.
A study of the social, emotional,physical, and intellectual characteristics of the gifted child, including methods of identifying the gifted child.

652 Teaching the Gifted Child* Three hours.
A study of the programs, curricula, methodologies, media and materials for the education of the gifted child.

653 Curricula Development for the Gifted* Three hours.
This course focuses on the development of modules for advanced placement classes and writing/choosing appropriate curricula for elementary or secondary gifted children.

654 Trends in Gifted Education and Practicum* Three hours.
Through research and discussion, the student develops understanding of problems and current trends in gifted education. Students work with gifted students in a public school or clinical setting.

655 Curriculum for Artistically and Creatively Gifted* Three hours.
An examination of research and practice dealing with the concept of artistic talent and implications for curricula in the visual and performing arts.
*These courses are available only for students who wish to add gifted education to an existing elementary or secondary teaching license.

660 Organizational Procedures for Special Education Three hours.
A study of the organizational procedures of special education as required by the Mississippi State Department of Education and the legislative and court decisions associated with special education are covered in this course. This class may be online enhanced.

668 Intellectual Disabilities Three hours.
This course is an overview of intellectual disabilities including etiology and syndromes, theoretical research bases, and social, emotional, physical, and intellectual characteristics.
Same as PSY 661 This class may be online enhanced.

669 Teaching Individuals with Mild Intellectual Disabilities Three hours.
This course addresses basic assessment procedures, selection, and utilization of instructional methods, materials, and individualized programming for individuals with mild intellectual disabilities.
Prerequisite EDU 668.

663 learning Disabilities Three hours.
This course is an overview of the field of learning disabilities including historical development, theoretical research bases, and social, emotional, physical and learning characteristics.
Same as PSY 663 This class may be online enhanced.

664 Teaching Individuals with learning Disabilities Three hours.
This course addresses basic assessment procedures, selection and utilization of instructional methods, materials, and individualized programming for individuals with specific learning disabilities.
Prerequisite EDU 663.

665 Behavior Management Three hours.
This course will examine the laws, history, and prevalence of behavior disorders. Assessment instruments and procedures will be presented along with extensive coverage of intervention plans, curricula, and classroom management strategies. Field experience may be included.
Same as PSY 665.

666 Teaching Individuals with Severe/Profound Intellectual Disabilities Three hours.
This course addresses basic assessment procedures, selection, and utilization of instructional methods, materials, and individualized programming for individuals with severe or profound intellectual disabilities.

667 Internship in Working with Individuals with Severe/Profound Intellectual Disabilities Three hours.
This course serves as a field experience to apply knowledge and ideas garnered in EDU 666 within a realistic setting. The student will serve a minimum of 80 contact hours with this population, in addition to 10 hours in a seminar discussing such experiences, goals and objectives that have been established for such an experience.

680 organizational Development Three hours.
The basic principles, concepts, and current issues that determine organizational development and growth.
Same as PSY 681

681 Supervisory Practices Three hours.
Current principles and practices in supervision that lead to successful organizational operation.

683 Administration of Personnel Three hours.
Guidelines to developing effective personnel policies for both certified and classified personnel including manpower planning and job descriptions.
Same as PSY 683.

684 Public School law Three hours.

A study of local, state, and federal laws; court decisions, and legal opinions affecting public education.

685 School Business Management Three hours.
The analysis of local, state, and federal financing of public education with particular emphasis on factors governing financial policies and practice, sources of revenue, and budget making.

686 Consensus Decision Making and Conflict Resolution Three hours.
Designed to help teachers and administrators improve their skills in working with faculty and community groups in educational decision making and resolving conflict.
Same as PSY 686.

687 Practicum in School Administration and Supervision Three hours.
Seminar and practical experiences in studying and solving current problems in elementary/secondary school administration.

688 Community Relations Three hours.
Examines the relationship between organizations and the communities they serve and strategies used to maintain strong public support.

689 leadership in organizations Three hours.
Examines both the leadership and management skills necessary in any organizational operation.

695 Advanced Individual Study One to six hours.
Title and content of course will be determined when scheduled. This course may be used to clear deficiencies in the student's program.

699 Directed Study One to six hours.
This course is supervised experience and/or study in administration at the elementary or secondary school level. (By special permission only.)

English (ENG)

The English Department of William Carey University, in keeping with the Goals Statement as put forth by the Master of Education program, seeks to provide students with

  1. academic credentials that may allow them to advance in the chosen field of employment;
  2. opportunities to specialize in the chosen field of English;
  3. opportunities to build upon their undergraduate studies and work experience; and
  4. opportunities to become strong professional leaders within the English discipline.

Ordinarily, the M.Ed. candidate who wishes to specialize in English will be an undergraduate English major or minor. In general, the M.Ed./English candidates should have a mastery of rhetoric, composition, literature, and pedagogy. Candidates who do not have an undergraduate major/minor in English will have their undergraduate transcript evaluated so that academic deficiencies in English may be addressed before beginning the graduate program in English. These deficiencies may require the candidate to enroll in additional undergraduate classes; these classes, however, may be taken for pass/fail credit.

Each M.Ed./English candidate will be assigned an academic advisor who will both guide the candidate in course selection and track the candidate's academic success. Graduate English classes are listed under the Master of Arts in English section of this catalog.

History and Social Science (HIS)

The department of history and social science seeks to provide Master of Education students with an opportunity to expand their methodological, interpretative and factual acumen in social studies. Typically, the M.Ed. candidate who wishes to specialize in social studies will be an undergraduate history or social science major or minor. Candidates who do not have an undergraduate major/minor in history or social science will have their undergraduate transcript evaluated so that academic deficiencies in history and social science may be addressed before beginning the graduate program in social studies. These deficiencies may require the candidate to enroll in additional undergraduate classes.

Each M.Ed./social studies candidate will be assigned an academic advisor. Requirements for the social studies concentration include 15 hours of courses in graduate history or social science, nine hours of core M.Ed. courses (EDU 620, 630, 640), and six hours of graduate electives. Only six hours of the total program may be taken at the 500-level.

502 Progressive Era Three hours.
A study of reformers and reform in the United States during the early twentieth century.

511 History of Christianity Three hours.
A study of Christianity’s historical foundations, expansion, historical theology, and cultural influences.

513 Renaissance and Reformation Three hours.
A study of the Renaissance and the Protestant Reformation with primary attention given to the interrelationship of these movements.

521 Historiography Three hours.
The theory and practice of historical writing from Herodotus to the antiquarian empiricists.

532 History of Russia Three hours.
A survey of Russian history from Slavic origins to the present day.

558 The Contemporary World Three hours.
A regional study of the world since 1945.

570 The Roman Republic Three hours.

A study of the origins, growth, and demise of the Roman Republic in the ancient Mediterranean world, 509 B.C. to 31 B.C.

571 The Roman Empire Three hours.
A study of the transition from Roman Republic to Roman Empire, 31 B.C. to 312 A.D

572 The Byzantine Empire Three hours.
A study of the survival of the Roman Empire in the East down to the fall of Constantinople in 1453.

620 The British Empire Three hours.
A study of the political, social, economic and religious institutions of the British Empire from 1600 through 1947.

621 Britain, 1485-1714 Three hours.
A study of the government and culture of Britain and Ireland during the reigns of the Tudors and the Stuarts.

622 Britain, 1714-1850 Three hours.
The study of the emergence of Britain as the pre-eminent world power.

623 Reformation Historiography Three hours.
A study of the historiographical trends that have governed recent understandings of the European Reformation.

624 French Revolution Three hours.
A study of the collapse of the Bourbon monarchy and its replacement by a revolutionary regime.

625 Mississippi History Three hours.
A study of the history of Mississippi from pre-history to the present.

630 The later Roman Empire Three hours.
A study of the decline of the Roman world and its transformation into Medieval Europe.

631 Historiography of Medieval Europe Three hours.
An historiographic study of major works of scholarship on the history of medieval Europe, 300-1500.

632 The Crusades Three hours.
A study of the development and history of the crusading movement in western history through the use of both primary and secondary sources.

633 The Early Church Three hours.
A study of the rise of the early church as well as the various internal and external challenges faced by the earliest Christians.

634 The Italian City-State Three hours.
A study of the unique culture of the Italian city-republics during the late medieval and Renaissance periods.

650 European Historiography, 1815 to the Present Three hours.
An historiographical study of periods and topics from the age of Metternich to the present.

659 Historiography of Nineteenth Century America Three hours.
An historiographical study of topics and periods in nineteenth century America.

660 Historiography of Modern America Three hours.
An historiographical study of topics and periods in modern America since 1950.

669 Historiography of Asia and Africa Three hours.
An historiographical study of Asian and African topics.

Mathematics (MAT)

The mathematics department of William Carey University, in keeping with the goals statement of the Master of Education program, offers a graduate mathematics curriculum designed to provide students with

  1. academic credentials that may allow them to advance in the chosen field of employment;
  2. opportunities to specialize in the chosen field of the teaching of mathematics;
  3. opportunities to build upon their undergraduate studies and work experience; and
  4. opportunities to become strong professional leaders within the mathematics discipline

Ordinarily, the M.Ed. candidate who wishes to specialize in mathematics will be an undergraduate mathematics major (or strong minor). Candidates who do not have this background in mathematics will have their undergraduate transcript evaluated so that academic deficiencies may be addressed. These deficiencies may require the candidate to enroll in additional undergraduate classes; these classes, however, may be taken for pass/fail credit.

Each Master of Education in mathematics candidate will be assigned an academic advisor who will guide the candidate in course selection.

Graduate mathematics classes are offered on a rotation schedule, with the majority of the classes offered in the summer term.

536 Geometry Three hours.

Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries with emphasis given to their logical development from basic assumptions are studied.

541 Abstract Algebra Three hours.
The algebraic structure of the rational, real, and complex numbers is studied.

551 Advanced Calculus Three hours.
An intensive and detailed study of continuous and differential functions.

553 Differential Equations Three hours.

A basic course in differential equations including differential equations of the first order, applications, linear differential equations, and series methods.

603 Algebra with Technology Three hours.
A comprehensive study of the functions and capabilities of graphing calculators (hand-held computers) and their dual use in mathematical computation and as a tool for understanding algebra topics and the graphs and properties of relations and functions. A variety of mathematical explorations (keyed to both the Mississippi Mathematics Framework and CUPM recommendations for the training of teachers of mathematics) are used to attain skill in the use of each ca1cu1ator feature.

613 Higher Math with Technology Three hours.
A comprehensive study of the functions and capabilities of graphing calculators (hand-held computers) and their dual use in computation in analysis, probability, statistics, and trigonometry and as a tool for understanding these topics. A follow-up to MAT 603, which is a useful previous course, but not a required pre-requisite.

623 Mathematics with Technology Three hours.
A companion course to MAT 603 and MAT 613, this course emphasizes the use of computer algebra systems (CAS) on calculators and computers to develop an understanding of mathematics and to use these features in problem-solving and computation.

635 Foundations of Higher Math Three hours.
Logic, sets, relations, functions, denumerable sets, cardinal numbers, and ordered sets, with emphasis throughout on the nature and techniques of mathematical proof.

641 Seminar in Algebra Three hours.
An intensive study of algebra with emphasis on the relationship of algebra to other areas of mathematics.

643 Seminar in linear Algebra Three hours.
An in-depth study of linear algebra topics and applications with emphasis on vector spaces, inner product spaces, linear transformations, eigenvectors, eigenvalues, and an introduction to numerical methods.
Prerequisite: MAT 341.

651 Seminar in Analysis Three hours.
An intensive study of analysis which emphasizes applications to real life problems.

661 Seminar in Geometry Three hours.
An intensive study of selected topics in geometry.

671 History of Mathematics Three hours.
A study of the origin and development of mathematical concepts in which an effort is made to discover the role of mathematics in the cultural development of mankind.

672 Seminar in Mathematics Education Three hours.
Current trends and issues in the teaching of mathematics in secondary schools are studied. Special emphasis will be given to problems in curriculum and methods of instruction.

680 Seminar in Problem Solving Three hours.
An exploration of various mathematical topics and contexts to learn mathematics, to pose problems and make conjectures, to solve problems, to develop a variety of problem solving strategies, and to communicate mathematical demonstrations and proofs.

Curriculum for the Master of Education Degree in Career and Technical Education

The Master of Education degree in career and technical education is offered with two specialized concentrations. The teaching concentration is for students who intend to enter or continue technical and career education upon graduation as secondary or postsecondary instructors. This is a 30-hour program.

The military/training concentration is for students who are interested in military or industrial training in subject areas that are not offered in secondary or post secondary career and technical programs. This is a 36-hour program intended to support GS 1750 requirements.

Master of Education in Career and Technical Education(Teaching Concentration: 30 hours)

  1. Professional Education (9 hours)
  2. CTE 605. History of Technology and Occupational Education or
    CTE 652. History and Philosophy of Career and Technical Education
    CTE 607. Curriculum Design in Career and Technical Education
    CTE 611. Philosophy and Organization of Occupational Education

  3. Teaching Concentration (18 hours)
  4. CTE 641 Foundations of Career and Technical Education
    CTE 642. Management of the Career &Technical Education Learning Environment
    CTE 643. Design of Career & Technical Education Programs
    CTE 644. Development of Career & Technical Instructional Materials
    CTE 645. Delivery of Career & Technical Instructional Program
    CTE 646. Evaluation of Career & Technical Student Performance

  5. Electives (3 hours)
  6. One course chosen with the approval of the instructor

Master of Education in Career and Technical Education (Military/Industrial Training Concentration: 36 hours)

  1. Professional Education (9 hours)
  2. CTE 605. History of Technology and Occupational Education or
    CTE 652. History and Philosophy of Career and Technical Education
    CTE 607. Curriculum Design in Career and Technical Education
    CTE 611. Philosophy and Organization of Occupational Education

  3. Military/Industrial Training Concentration (24 hours)
  4. CTE 641 Foundations of Career and Technical Education
    CTE 643 Design of Career & Technical Education Programs
    CTE 644. Development of Career & Technical Instructional Materials
    CTE 645. Delivery of Career & Technical Instructional Program
    CTE 646 Evaluation of Career & Technical Student Performance
    CTE 690 Adult Education and Learning Theory
    EDU 620 Teacher as Researcher

  5. Electives (3 hours)
  6. One course chosen with the approval of the instructor

Course Descriptions for Career and Technical Education

641 Foundations of Career and Technical Education (3 hours)
An overview of the methods, learning theories, delivery models, and purpose of the career and technical education.

642 Management of the Career and Technical Education learning Environment (3 hours)
Management of equipment, inventory, physical facilities, and emergency planning.

643 Design of Career and Technical Education Programs (3 hours)
Occupational analysis-based program design and sequencing of instructional program.

644 Development of Career and Technical Instructional Materials: (3 hours)
Selection, development, and use of instructional media for hybrid and online instruction.

645 Delivery of Career and Technical Instructional Programs: (3 hours)
Learning theory and models for instructional delivery in the CTE classroom and laboratory.

646 Evaluation of Career and Technical Student Performance: (3 hours)
Development and utilization of various testing and survey instruments, statistical treatment of data, and generation of evaluative reports

647 Industrial Human Relations: (3 hours)
An examination of interpersonal dynamics within the workplace environment for industrial trainers and educators

652 History and Philosophy of Career and Technical Education: (3 hours)
Evolution and organization of career and technical education

605 History of Technology and occupational Education: (3 hours)
A study of the leaders, movements, and agencies influential in the development of technical and occupational education

607 Curriculum Design in Career and Technical Education: (3 hours)
The design and development of curriculum models and theories from behaviorism to constructivism in career and technical education

611 Philosophy and organization of occupational Education: (3 hours)
Foundation and development of vocational education under national, state, and local influences

690 Adult Education and learning Theory: (3 hours)
Learning theories for working with adult students in industrial, military and corporate environments

Master of Education

Educational leadership

The School of Education offers the Master of Education in Educational Leadership degree program which leads to elementary and secondary principal licensure in school administration (P-12). This leadership degree is pending approval from the Mississippi Department of Education in fall 2011.

Vision

The vision of William Carey University’s leadership program is to equip educational leadership candidates to become change agents for positively impacting students’ lives, socially, emotionally and academically.

Goals and objectives

The vision and values are instilled through the following guiding principles:

  1. Effective leaders develop and articulate reasonable personal and school goals;
  2. Effective leaders are instructional leaders and are knowledgeable about analyzing data, identifying, securing, and organizing appropriate resources for school reform (human, technological, etc.);
  3. Effective leaders create nurturing and caring educational environments;
  4. Effective leaders are knowledgeable about safe practices regarding ethical, legal, social, and political issues;
  5. Effective leaders skillfully communicate with internal and external publics;
  6. Effective leaders emphasize the importance of literacy; and
  7. Effective leaders skillfully practice leadership theories in real world settings.

Admissions Requirements

A. General

  1. Each applicant must hold a baccalaureate degree or graduate degree from an accredited college or university.
  2. Each applicant must file with the graduate office of admissions the following:

    • • Documentation certifying at least three years of teaching experience
    • A resume, transcripts, and licensure
    • Graduate Record Exam score or Miller’s Analogy Score (competitive)
    • A letter of support from school superintendent and a letter of support from the principal
  3. Additionally, applicant must have a G.P.A. of 3.0 for the last 64 hours in the undergraduate program or 3.5 in the graduate program.
  4. After acceptance by the graduate office of admissions, each applicant must complete a writing sample and interview administered by the department of educational leadership.

B. Other

  1. Students move through the program in cohorts.
  2. A minimum of 36 semester hours of graduate work must be completed with a minimum grade point average of 3.25 maintained. Only two grades lower than a B are allowed. Upon receiving a second grade lower than a B, a student is advised to repeat on one of the first two grades lower than a B before continuing in the program. A student making a third grade lower than a B will be dismissed from the program. All appeals to policy relative to academic standing are made through the appropriate dean and, as necessary, to the graduate academic appeals subcommittee of the graduate committee.
  3. A student must complete all required work within a period of six years after enrolling in graduate courses.
  4. A thesis is not an option in the Master of Education in Educational Leadership degree.
  5. A written comprehensive examination will be required of each candidate prior to graduation. The contents of this examination will be determined by the graduate faculty. A student must have met all other degree requirements and be enrolled in the final six hours in order to take the comprehensive examination.
  6. A signed program of study should be on file prior to completing 12 hours.
  7. Candidates must successfully meet state requirements for Praxis SLLA (School Leadership Licensure Assessment) and any other licensure requirements mandated by the State of Mississippi as a graduation requirement.
  8. Participation in the graduation ceremony is required. Degrees are not conferred in absentia, except by the office of academic affairs’ special permission for which students must submit a written request. Students who are candidates for May degrees are required to file applications for their degrees in the registrar’s office by October 15. Candidates for August graduation must file by March 31. Late applications will be accepted up to 30 days after the respective deadlines. There will be a $50 late fee in addition to the graduation fee.

Curriculum for Master of Education in Educational leadership Degree

The academic requirements for a Master of Education in Educational Leadership degree consist of 36 semester hours from four categories (Landscapes).

  • LANDSCAPE ONE: Organizational Horizons
    EDL 601 Organizational Leadership 3 hours
    EDL 602 Roles of the Principal 3 hours
  • LANDSCAPE TWO: Instructional Horizons
    EDL 603 Research-Based Instruction 3 hours
    EDL 604 Data Driven Instruction 3 hours
    EDL 608 Best Practices 3 hours
    EDL 607 Instructional Leadership 3 hours
    EDL 617 Human and Student Diversity 3 hours
  • LANDSCAPE THREE: Humanistic Horizons
    EDL 605 Human Resources Management 3 hours
    EDL 606 Judicial and Ethics Considerations 3 hours
    EDL 688 School and Community Climates 3 hours
  • LANDSCAPE FOUR: Practicing Horizons
    EDL 635 Practicum and Internship 6 hours
    Internship I (Pass or Fail Grade) 1 hour
    Internship II (Pass or Fail Grade) 1 hour
    Internship III (Pass or Fail Grade) 1 hour
    Internship IV (A, B, or C) 3 hours

Course Descriptions

Educational Leadership (EDL)

601 organizational leadership. Three hours.
The study of the fundamental principles and culture of the educational organization and administration as well as concepts for development and growth.

602 Roles of the Principal Three hours.
This course identifies specific roles of the principal and equips the school leader in becoming a facilitator in sustaining a school culture that promotes the success of students and staff by ensuring management of the organization and resources for a safe, efficient, and effective learning environment.

603 Data-Driven Instruction Three hours.
This course examines the utilization of educational data to make informed decisions for leading schools.

604 Research-Based Instruction Three hours.
This is a study of research-based approaches to leading and assessing instructional processes. Required of all graduate students in the Master of Education in Educational Leadership degree program.

605 Human Resources Management Three hours.
This course examines the processes of personnel administration in educational organizations, for both certified and non-certified personnel. It provides a comprehensive overview of personnel administration as it relates to recruitment, selection, orientation, professional development, motivation, work incentives, grievance management, reduction in force, employee discipline, employee evaluation, salary, fringe benefits, sexual harassment, discrimination, and worker’s compensation.

606 Judicial and Ethics Considerations Three hours.
This course includes the exploration of local, state, and federal laws, court decisions, and legal opinions affecting public education.

607 Instructional leadership Three hours.
This course trains the candidate to organize human, financial, physical, and community resources for leading school improvement.

608 Best Practices Three hours.
This course examines the new standards for various subject areas for the “state-of-the-art teaching” as set by national educational and professional organizations as well as national exemplary programs.

617 Human and Student Diversity Three hours.
This course helps the candidate to understand students from diverse and cultural backgrounds, and examines ways to develop learning environments that support and improve student learning.

635 Practicum and Internship Six hours.
Participation in reflective field experiences and observations of all aspects of day-to-day school operations. (400 internship hours)

688 School Community Climates Three hours.
The course examines the relationship between organizations and communities, and explores strategies to maintain healthy school support.

SPECIALIST IN EDUCATION

Specialized Concentrations:

Elementary Education
Elementary Education for MAT Graduates
Secondary Education
Higher Education Administration

The School of Education offers the Specialist in Education degree program with concentrations in elementary education, elementary education for MAT graduates, secondary education, and higher education administration.

Elementary Education Concentration

Admission Requirements

Students are admitted to the specialist program as a cohort class. When a sufficient applicant pool is available, prospective candidates will be interviewed, provide a writing sample, and complete other requirements. No students will be admitted on a provisional or probationary basis. Students may transfer in no more than six hours of coursework from any institution into the program. Coursework used in a previous degree may not be used toward the specialist degree.

To fulfill requirements for admission to the specialist in elementary education degree program, the student must:

  1. Hold (or qualify to hold) a master's degree from an institution fully accredited by a recognized accrediting agency.
  2. Hold (or qualify to hold) a Class AA certificate in elementary education.
  3. Present evidence of acceptable scholarship:

    • An average of at least a 3.25 on previous master’s degree work and
    • A minimum composite score of 800 (taken prior to July 2012) on the verbal and quantitative subsections of the Graduate Record Exam or 290 (verbal and quantitative—taken after July 2012). The Miller’s Analogy Test score of 370 is also accepted
    • OR; An average of at least a 3.50 on previous master’s degree work and
    • A minimum composite score of 750 (taken prior to July 2012) on the verbal and quantitative subsections of the Graduate Record Exam or 285 (verbal and quantitative—taken after July 2012). The Miller’s Analogy Test score of 350 is also accepted
  4. Have completed at least two years of successful teaching experience(as indicated by the verification form).
  5. Complete and file with the graduate admissions' office the proper application for admission to graduate school.
  6. Complete the interview and writing components of the admission process.
  7. Submit vitae or resume.

Potential students will hold or qualify to hold a master’s degree from an institution fully accredited by a recognized accrediting agency, and hold or qualify to hold a Class AA certification in elementary education. Potential students applying for admission to the specialist program will provide a writing sample and participate in an interview process on a date set by the Education Department. Potential students will also submit official transcripts for undergraduate and/or graduate work, take the GRE or MAT and provide the scores, and will provide two letters of recommendation and a curriculum vitae or resume. A weight system will be used when examining the submitted information. A committee will examine the above listed information and make acceptance decisions after an evaluation of the information from all potential students who have made application for the program.

Requirements for All Candidates

The academic requirements for a specialist in education degree are the 36-hour program outlined below, successful completion of a research component and a comprehensive examination taken during the final trimester of coursework.

Professional Education Core (12 hours)
EDU 701 Seminar in K-12 Education
EDU 702 Advanced K-12 School Curriculum
EDU 703 Theories of Learning
RSH 720 Research Foundations

Research Component (6 hours)
EDU 721 Field Research Project

Special Education Requirement (6 hours)
EDU 660 Organizational Procedures for Special Education
EDU 663 Learning Disabilities

Electives (12 hours)
Choose four courses with approval of advisor. All courses must be at the 600 or higher level.

For MAT Graduates
Instead of the 12 hours of electives for completion of the 36-hour program, the following courses are required for completion of the 51-hour program. This program will allow an educator to add the K-4 license to an existing 4-8 license.

Additional Requirements (27 hours)
EDU 574 Reading in the Middle/Secondary School
EDU 601 Social Studies in the Elementary School
EDU 603 Seminar in Early Childhood
EDU 607 Math in Elementary School
EDU 609 Science in the Elementary School
EDU 615 Language Arts in the Elementary School
EDU 616 Art in the Elementary School
EDU 627 Performance Assessment
EDU 637 Advanced Diagnosis of Reading and Writing Difficulties

Secondary Education Concentration

Admission Requirements
Students are admitted to the specialist program as a cohort class. When a sufficient applicant pool is available, prospective candidates will be interviewed, provide a writing sample, and complete other requirements. No students will be admitted on a provisional or probationary basis. Students may transfer in no more than six hours of coursework from any institution into the program. Coursework used in a previous degree may not be used toward the specialist degree.

To fulfill requirements for admission to the specialist in secondary education degree program, the student must:

  1. Hold (or qualify to hold) a master’s degree in secondary education or a specific subject area related to secondary education from an institution fully accredited by a recognized accrediting agency.
  2. Hold (or qualify to hold) a Class AA certification in secondary education or a specific subject area related to secondary education.
  3. Present evidence of acceptable scholarship:

    • An average of at least a 3.25 on previous master’s degree workand
    • A minimum composite score of 800 (taken prior to July 2012) on the verbal and quantitative subsections of the Graduate Record Exam or 290 (verbal and quantitative- taken after July 2012). The Miller’s Analogy Test score of 370 is also accepted. OR
    • An average of at least a 3.50 on previous master’s degree work and
    • A minimum composite score of 750 (taken prior to July 2012) on the verbal and quantitative subsections of the Graduate Record Exam or 285 (verbal and quantitative- taken after July 2012). The Miller’s Analogy Test score of 350 is also accepted.
  4. Have completed at least two years of successful teaching experience (as indicated by the verification form.
  5. Complete and file with the graduate admissions’ office the proper application for admission to graduate school
  6. Complete the interview and writing components of the admission process.
  7. Submit vitae or resume.

Potential students will hold or qualify to hold a master’s degree in secondary education or a subject area related to secondary education from an institution fully accredited by a recognized accrediting agency, and hold or qualify to hold a Class AA certification in secondary education or a specific subject area related to secondary education. Potential students applying for admission to the specialist program will provide a writing sample and participate in an interview process on a date set by the School of Education.

Potential students will also submit official transcripts for undergraduate and /or graduate work, take the GRE or MAT and provide the scores, and will provide two letters of recommendation and a curriculum vitae or resume. A weight system will be used when examining the submitted information. A committee will examine the above listed information and make acceptance decisions after an evaluation of the information from all potential students who have made application for the program.

Requirements for all Candidates
The academic requirements for a specialist in education degree are the 36-hour program outlined below, successful completion of a research component, and a comprehensive examination taken during the final trimester of coursework.

Professional Education Core (12 hours)
EDU 701 Seminar in K-12 Education
EDU 702 Advanced K-12 School Curriculum
EDU 703 Theories of Learning
RSH 720 Research Foundations

Research Component (6 hours)
EDU 721 Field Research Project

Special Education Requirement (6 hours)
EDU 660 Organizational Procedures for Special Education
EDU 663 Learning Disabilities

Electives (12 hours)
Choose four courses with approval of advisor. All courses must be at the 600 or higher level.

Specialist in Higher Education Administration

Admission Requirements

Students are admitted to the specialist in higher education administration program as a cohort class. When a sufficient applicant pool is available, prospective candidates will be interviewed, provide a writing sample, and complete other requirements. No students will be admitted on a provisional or probationary basis. Students may transfer in no more than six hours of coursework from any institution into the program. Coursework used in a previous degree may not be used toward the specialist degree.

To fulfill requirements for admission to the specialist in higher education administration degree program, the student must:

  1. Hold (or qualify to hold) a master’s degree from an institution fully accredited by a recognized accrediting agency.
  2. Present evidence of acceptable scholarship with an average of at least 3.00 on previous master’s degree work.
  3. Complete and file with the graduate admissions’ office the proper application for admission to graduate school.
  4. Complete the interview and writing components of the admission process.

Potential students will hold or qualify to hold a master’s degree from an institution fully accredited by a recognized accrediting agency. Potential students will also submit official transcripts for undergraduate and/or graduate work, and will provide two letters of recommendation and a curriculum vitae or resume. A weight system will be used when examining the submitted information. A committee will examine the above listed information and make acceptance decisions after an evaluation of the information from all potential students who have made application for the program.

Course Requirements
The academic requirements for a specialist in the higher education administration degree are the 34-hour program outlined below, successful completion of a research component, and the completion of the action research project.

Higher Education Administration Core (21 Hours)
EDH 701 History and Foundations of Higher Education
EDH 702 Survey of the Community College
EDH 703 Legal and Ethical Issues in Higher Education
EDH 704 Community Relations and Continuing Education Programs
EDH 705 Teaching and Learning in Higher Education
EDH 706 Seminar of Current Issues in Higher Education
EDH 707 Finance in Higher Education

Professional Writing Component (1 Hour)
EDU 790 APA Style for Professional Writing

Research Component (6 Hours)
RSH 720 Research Foundations
RSH 740 Survey Design, Descriptive Statistics, and Evaluation

Action Research Project (6 Hours)
EDH 721 Field Research Project
TOTAL: 34 Hours

Cognate Content Area (optional - 9 Hours)
Students in the higher education administration specialist program may elect to take nine hours of discipline-specific courses for the purpose of content credentialing. The student will select three courses with the approval of his/her advisor. All courses must be at the 600 or higher level.

Course Descriptions

Education (EDU)

701 Seminar in Elementary Education Three hours.
The advanced study of major problems in elementary education and elementary schools. Cannot be completed through independent study.

702 Advanced Elementary School Curriculum Three hours.
A comprehensive in-depth study of the development and implementation of curricula in elementary schools.

703 Theories of learning Three hours.
The study of the process and theories of learning in direct relation to education.

721 Field Research Project Six hours.
The investigation of a significant problem in elementary education using scientific research skills. A scholarly written report is required. Register for six hours. The field project must be completed in one academic year or three consecutive trimesters.
(Prerequisite: EDU 720)

790 APA Style for Professional Writing One hour.
A study of the application of American Psychological Association (APA) style requirements for professional writing.

Higher Education Administration (EDH)

701 History and Foundations of Higher Education Three hours.
This course is an introduction and overview of higher education, including the development of higher education in the United States, the nature of institutions of higher education, and the major trends, challenges, and issues in higher education today.

702 Survey of the Community College Three hours.
This course provides an overview of the administrative aspects of two-year institutions, including the scope and role of two-year institutions in higher education.

703 legal and Ethical Issues in Higher Education Three hours.
This course encompasses legal issues and policies that affect how higher education is governed and how administrators in higher education implement policies and practices to ensure compliance with federal and state laws. Specific legal cases will be examined and analyzed, and subsequent legal and ethical implications will be discussed.

704 Community Relations and Continuing Education Three hours.

This courses examines the economic, social, and political issues associated with postsecondary continuing education programs, including the relationship between these programs and the communities they serve and strategies used to maintain strong public support.

705 Teaching and learning in Higher Education Three hours.
This course studies the historical and theoretical development of higher education curricula in the United States. The elements that relate to best practices in teaching and learning will be examined, as well as the administrator’s role to oversee curricula planning.

706 Seminar of Current Issues in Higher Education Three hours.
This course explores contemporary trends and issues in higher education.

707 Finance in Higher Education Three hours.
This course will explore the sources of funds, resources by institutional type, and the differences between funding sources for institutions of higher learning. This course will explain budget and financial terminology and prepare students to read and analyze higher education budgets for 2 and 4 year colleges, and study current and future issues which affect higher education finance and budgeting.

721 Field Research Project Three hours.
This course is designed as an investigation of a significant problem in higher education using scientific research skills. A scholarly written report is required. Students will meet with the Field Project Director as needed. During EDH 721, the field project will be investigated, analyzed, and reported upon to the advisory committee. Six hours total credit (two terms).

Research (RSH)

720 Research Foundations Three hours.
This course is designed to emphasize the application of foundational research methodology through the development of a research project pre-proposal in the area of major concentration. Candidates will develop a research project pre-proposal which must be approved by an advisory committee member. This course is for specialist and/or doctoral students only.

740 Survey Design, Descriptive Statistics, and Evaluation Three hours.
This course is a study of proper survey design and administration, descriptive statistics, data analysis, and evaluation.

Doctor of Education in Higher Education Administration

The purpose of the Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) in higher education administration is to prepare candidates to be successful leaders in postsecondary institutions through visionary planning, strategic utilization of resources, effective management and leadership, and practical application of research.

Admission Requirements

Students are admitted to the Ed.D. program as a cohort class each fall term at the Hattiesburg campus. If a sufficient pool is available, prospective candidates will be interviewed and complete other requirements. No students will be admitted on a provisional or probationary basis. Students may transfer in no more than six hours of coursework from any institution into the program. Coursework used in a previous degree may not be used toward the doctoral degree. However, the Education Specialist degree in higher education administration awarded from William Carey University will be accepted as credit toward the higher education administration doctoral degree.

To fulfill requirements for admission to the Ed.D. in higher education administration, the student must:

  1. Meet the university’s general requirements for graduate admission.
  2. Have completed the specialist in higher education administration degree awarded from William Carey University.
  3. Present evidence of acceptable scholarship with an average of at least a 3.25 GPA on the higher education administration specialist degree work.
  4. Submit two written letters of recommendation—one from a professor and one from a supervisor.
  5. Submit a resume or curriculum vita to the higher education administration program coordinator.
  6. Complete an interview conducted by the higher education administration doctoral admissions committee.
  7. Submit Graduate Record Exam (GRE) scores earned within the past five years of application submission date. These scores must include the quantitative, verbal, and written components.

Admission is competitive and highly selective based on the above criteria and other considerations. A weight system will be used when examining the submitted information. The higher education administration admissions committee will examine the above listed information and make acceptance decisions after an evaluation of the information from all potential students who have made application to the program.

Requirements for All Candidates

The academic requirements for the Ed.D. in higher education administration include successful program progression and graduation requirements. The program progression requirements are as follows:

  1. Must maintain a 3.0 G.P.A.
  2. Must complete all required program work within a period of six years after enrolling in the higher education administration program. If the student has already completed a specialist degree in higher education administration, then the student will have three years to complete coursework and the dissertation.
  3. A signed program of study must be on file prior to completing nine hours.
  4. Students may only have one replacement grade. This includes specialist and doctoral level coursework. Other courses may be retaken and averaged in the student’s GPA. Students who make more than two C’s in the program (this includes specialist and doctoral coursework) will be dismissed from the program.

The academic requirements for the doctorate in higher education administration degree include successful completion of the specialist degree in higher education administration, doctoral coursework, comprehensive examination, and dissertation. In addition, there is a G.P.A. requirement. Specifically, to meet the graduation requirements of the doctoral program, the student must:

  1. Complete 67 program hours as outlined in the curriculum.
  2. Pass a written comprehensive examination.
  3. Successfully complete all dissertation requirements as per the dissertation guidelines, chair, and committee. This includes successfully defending the dissertation proposal and final defense before the dissertation committee.
  4. Have a cumulative G.P.A. of 3.0 or higher.

The coursework for the doctoral program is outlined below (after completing the specialist degree in higher education administration):

leadership Core: 9 Hours
EDU 750 Leadership and Professional Responsibilities
EDU 760 General Leadership Theories
EDU 770 Educational Organizational Behavior

Research Courses: 9 Hours
RSH 770 Correlation and Regression Analysis and Evaluation
RSH 780 Quasi-Experimental Designs and Evaluation
RSH 800 Inferential Statistics, Analysis of Variance and Evaluation

Scholarly Writing Component:1 Hour
EDU 790 APA Style for Professional Writing

Electives: 3 Hours
Must be 600 level or higher and selected with approval from advisor.

Cognate Content Area – Optional
Students may take hours in a discipline-specific area for the purpose of content credentialing. The student will select courses with advisor approval. All courses must be 600 level or higher.

The student will take a comprehensive examination after completing the doctoral coursework. It is the student’s responsibility to see his/her advisor to schedule a test time. The student must take 12 hours of dissertation study. It is recommended that the student take three hours over four trimesters, and the student must be enrolled in dissertation hours the trimester he/she successfully defends. Students must successfully defend the dissertation proposal and the final study results after data are collected.

Students will receive specific dissertation requirements from their academic department and dissertation chairs.

Course Descriptions

Education (EDU)

750 leadership and Professional Responsibilities Three hours.
An introduction to peculiarities and challenges of leading an organization/institution as it relates to the legal, political, and ethical implications of education.

760 General leadership Studies Three hours.
An in-depth look at how educational administrators manage and lead educational organizations, and how leadership styles have evolved.

770 Education organizational Behavior Three hours.
An examination of how educational organizations are usually structured and designed to utilize human, technological, fiscal, and physical resources for maximizing talents and student achievement.

790 APA Style for Professional Writing One hour.
A study of the application of American Psychological Association (APA) style requirements for professional writing.

Research (RSH)

770 Correlation and Regression Analysis and Evaluation Three hours.
Advanced study of relationships between variables and predictive statistical models.

780 Quasi-Experimental Designs and Evaluation Three hours.
Advanced study of quasi-experimental research designs, especially in educational studies.

800 Inferential Statistics, Analysis of Variance, and Evaluation Three hours.
A study of statistical data analysis and subsequent generalizations made from inferential analysis.

Higher Education Administration (EDH)

890 Dissertation One to twelve hours.
Completion of original research concluding in a written dissertation and oral defense as directed by dissertation chair and committee.