MESSAGE

NCATE 2010 Standard 1

Standard 1: Candidate Knowledge, Skills, and Professional Dispositions

Candidates preparing to work in schools as teachers or other school professionals know and demonstrate the content knowledge, pedagogical content knowledge and skills, pedagogical and professional knowledge and skills, and professional dispositions necessary to help all students learn. Assessments indicate that candidates meet professional, state, and institutional standards.

 

 

1a. Content Knowledge for Teacher Candidates

 

William Carey University’s School of Education enters the 21st century committed to development education professionals who can teach all students in every school setting; who can prepare learners for full participation in their communities, in their nation, and in the global society. Under the direction of the Mississippi Department of Education (MDE) Annual Process Review, the faculty completed total revisions of all syllabi aligning student learning outcomes to the learned societies. The assessment system was developed during this same time, expanded from the original SACS requirements of five assessments to multiple assessments from external and internal evaluations. Professional Dispositions while always an important part of each teacher candidate’s profile has now become clarified for the candidates and faculty members. The Unit’s institutional standards have been aligned with the University’s standards and mission. The Conceptual Framework has been expanded to include current research and best practice, and this has provided consistency and assessment across all programs. The departmental chairs and the Dean collect and analyze data on the progress of teacher candidates through the program.

 

The Assessment System, described in Standard 2, is only effective if it improves instructional practice and encourages faculty to model best delivery systems. It is the mission of the faculty to assist the districts and the state in creating a statewide learning community where all children and young people discover their gifts, reach their highest potential, and achieve success in life.

 

Content knowledge is assessed through content knowledge examinations and more importantly through field practice real world applications. The Unit endorses Interstate New Teachers Assessment and Support Consortium (INTASC) as part of the initial program foundation. The Mississippi State Standards for Professional Education are part of the initial framework and are aligned to the WCU Institutional and SOE Unit Conceptual Framework and the key assessments for candidate proficiencies. The syllabi are aligned to the national professional standards.

 

In 2009, the Unit submitted all initial licensure programs for an extensive review under the Mississippi Department of Education’s Blue Ribbon Commission for the Renewal of Educator Preparation. All programs were approved at the satisfactory or excellent level. This review was updated one year later when the Mississippi Department of Education returned to the Unit and validated the Unit’s responses to recommendations.

 

All programs have four to five transitions points. Faculty advisors in collaboration with content and pedagogy faculty monitor teacher candidate progress as they matriculate through the program and their professional development in content knowledge and professional skills. Transition points (B.S. in Elementary and/Secondary) are Admission and Program Core; Specialty, Clinical, and Professional; Student Teaching Internship; Graduation and Licensure; and Candidate Follow-up. The Advanced Graduate Transitions (MAT) are Entry, Pre-Candidacy, Professional Candidacy, and Exit. The Master of Education points are Entry, Candidacy, Professional, Exit.

 

The Mississippi Department of Education requires a demonstration of basic competency skills of each teacher candidate through the successful completion of PRAXIS I (Reading, Mathematics, and Writing). The Unit’s teacher candidates are performing at Reading (174), Mathematics (173), and Writing (174). The state cut score for Reading is 152 (WCU 174), Mathematics 172 (WCU 173), and Writing 169 (WCU 174). Mathematics has always tended to be the weaker area for elementary education teacher candidates.

 

 

 

WILLIAM CAREY UNIVERSITY

 

STANDARDS

 

Standard 1: Candidate Knowledge, Skills, and Professional Dispositions

Candidates preparing to work in schools as teachers or other school professionals know and demonstrate the content knowledge, pedagogical content knowledge and skills, pedagogical and professional knowledge and skills, and professional dispositions necessary to help all students learn. Assessments indicate that candidates meet professional, state, and institutional standards.

 

1a. Content Knowledge for Teacher Candidates

 

1a.1. What are the pass rates of teacher candidates in initial teacher preparation programs on state tests of content knowledge for each program and across all programs (i.e., overall pass rate

 

Table 1.1

Pass Rates on Content Licensure Tests for Initial Teacher Preparation

 

For Period: 2009-2010

 

 

 

 

Program

 

Name of Licensure Test / State Cut Score

 

# of Test Takers

 

 

% Passing State Licensure Test

BS Elementary Education K-6

PRAXIS II Elementary Education K-6

212

100

MAT Elementary Education 4-8

PRAXIS II Elementary Education 4-8 MAT

139

100

BS English Ed

MAT English Ed

PRAXIS II English

30

100

BS Social Studies Ed

MAT Social Studies Ed

PRAXIS II Social Studies

19

100

BS Biology

MAT Biology

PRAXIS II Biology

16

100

BS Mathematics

MAT Mathematics

PRAXIS II Mathematics

27

100

BS Music

MAT Music

PRAXIS II Music

7

100

BS Physical Ed

MAT Physical Ed

PRAXIS II Physical Education

32

100

BS Elementary Ed

Principles of Learning and Teaching K-6

107

100

BS Secondary Ed

Principles of Learning and Teaching 7-12

17

100

 

 

1a.2 (Programs Not Nationally Reviewed) What data from other key assessments indicate that candidates in initial teacher preparation programs demonstrate the content knowledge delineated in professional, state, and institutional standards

 

All initial teacher preparation programs are under national review, except for Speech Communication with no candidates in three years and Art Education with no candidates in three years.

 

 

1a.3. (Programs Not Nationally Reviewed) What data from key assessments indicate that advanced teacher candidates demonstrate an in-depth knowledge of the content knowledge delineated in professional, state, and institutional standards

Candidates in the advanced graduate programs must be certified teachers and have an undergraduate G.P.A. of 2.5. In August 2011, the Admissions G.P.A. requirement will be raised to 2.75 for all M.Ed. programs, except the M.A.T. Alternate Route which will remain at 2.5. They must maintain a 3.0 G.P.A. as evidence of a mastery of content and are assessed at the Master level for content knowledge through the Comprehensive Examination. These programs include:

*Master of Education – Elementary Education,

*Master of Education – Secondary Education, and

*Master of Education –Mild and Moderate Disabilities Education,

*Master of Education – Biology Education,

*Master of Education – Social Studies Education,

*Master of Education – English Education, and

*Master of Education – Mathematics Education.

 

The Comprehensive Examination questions have been aligned to national program standards and then analyzed based on those standards. The following tables show the comprehensive examination means by question, standard, and total mean average. The Student Learning Outcome was for graduate candidates to exceed 3.0 as an average across the questions and the program outcome was that program comprehensive exams would exceed 3.2. See Table 1.2.

 

In August 2010 three additional programs were added, the Master of Education in Career and Technical Education, the Specialist in Education – Elementary Education, and the Specialist in Education – Higher Education. Content knowledge will be evaluated through an action research project in each of these programs. At this time, no candidate has entered into the Action Research Project.

 

 

 

Table 1.2 Comprehensive Examinations Aligned by Standards

 

 

 

MAT SECONDARY

572

646

625

636

General

     

NPBTS

1

2

2C

2

4

     

NAEYC

 

 

4D4

 

 

     

ACEI

3.2; 2

 

3.2; 5.2

 

 

     

INTASC

3

4

4

 

 

     

IRA

 

4

4.2

 

4

     

ISTE

II1, 5, III2, 3

III, 4

II, III

 

II, III

     

NCTM

 

8.1, 8.7

 

 

 

     

NCTE

 

4.2, 4.5

 

 

 

     

NSTA

 

5

 

 

 

EXAM AVE

   

Nov-09

4.00

4.00

3.75

3.87

3.50

3.82

 

 

Jul-10

4.33

3.85

4.1

3.88

3.44

3.85

   

 

 

 

 

 

             

MAT ELEMENTARY

572

606

625

636

General

     

NPBTS

1

2

2C

1

4

     

NAEYC

 

4D

4D4

4D

 

     

ACEI

3.2; 2

2.8

3.2; 5.2

2.1, 4, 3.1

 

     

INTASC

3

1K

4

3

 

     

IRA

 

 

4.2

 

4

     

ISTE

II1, 5, III2, 3

 

II, III

 

II, III

EXAM AVE

   

Nov-09

4.00

3.00

3.88

3.25

3.00

3.56

   

Jul-10

4.11

2.75

4

3.8

3.33

3.6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

               

MED ELEMENTARY

611

606

601

636

General

607

609

 

NPBTS

1

2

2AB

1

4

2

2ABC

 

NAEYC

4D

4D

 

4D

1

4D

4D

 

ACEI

2.1, 3.1, 4

2.8

 

2.1, 4, 3.1

5.2

2.3, 2, 3.1

2.2, 3.1, 4

 

INTASC

2, 3

1K

3

3

7

3KL

3

 

IRA

1

2

 

4

4

 

 

 

ISTE

IV1, III2

 

II, III

 

II, III

II

II4

EXAM AVE

Nov-09

3.30

3.50

3.67

3.38

3.00

3.00

 

3.27

Jul-10

3.85

3.48

3.46

3.46

3.30

3.07

3.50

3.44

 

 

 

 

 

               

MED SECONDARY

627

646

625

636

General

626

572

 

NPBTS

3D

2

2C

1

4

1D, 2C, 3B

1

 

NAEYC

 

 

4D4

4D

1

 

 

 

ACEI

 

 

3.2; 5.2

2.1, 4, 3.1

5.2

 

3.2; 2

 

INTASC

 

4

4

3

7

3

3

 

IRA

3.1, 3.2

4

4.2

4

4

 

 

 

ISTE

IV1, 2

III, 4

II, III

 

II, III

II4, 5; III2

II1,5;III2,3

 

NCTM

 

8.1, 8.7

 

 

 

 

 

 

NCTE

 

4.2, 4.5

II, III

 

 

 

 

 

NSTA

 

5

 

 

 

 

 

EXAM AVE

Nov-09

4.00

3.80

3.69

3.59

2.00

 

3.86

3.58

Jul-10

3.75

3.85

4.10

3.88

3.44

 

4.33

3.89

                 

 

 

 

 

 

 

               

MED Mild Moderate Disabilities

660

661

662

663

664

665

   

NPBTS

1ABC

1ABC; 3A

1AC;2AC;3AB

1A

2C

3C

   

NAEYC

1

4D4

1AC

1A

1A

1

   

ACEI

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

INTASC

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

IRA

 

 

3.2; 4

 

 

 

   

ISTE

 

 

I, II

 

III1, 2

 

   

SPED

 

 

 

 

 

 

EXAM AVE

 

Nov-09

4.00

3.00

4.00

 

 

 

3.67

 

Jul-10

3.33

3.33

3.67

4.00

3.67

5.00

3.83

 

 

 

               
                 
                 

MED Gifted

651

652

653

654

655

     

NPBTS

1D

2C, 3CD

2

1

3A, 2C

     

NAEYC

 

 

 

 

 

     

NGAC

GT1K1, 2

GT7

GT4K1,2;4S1,2,3

GT1K5, 6

GT4K1,4S1,4S5

     

INTASC

2

3

2

8

2

     

IRA

 

 

 

 

 

     

ISTE

 

III

 

 

 

EXAM AVE

   

Nov-09

 

4

3.5

4

 

3.83

   

Jul-10

3.6

3.86

3.67

3.88

4.13

3.82

   

 

 

 

The unit aggregated the core curriculum grades for all elementary education students who had been admitted into the School of Education during 2009-2010. See Table 1.3. The total means are as follows: English/Literature 3.27; Art 3.57; Social Studies 3.19; Sciences 3.09; Mathematics 3.04; Psychology 3.35; Communications 3.43; and total Core Curriculum GPA 3.23.

 

Table 1.3 Content Knowledge G.P.A. Core Curriculum – Elementary Education

 

 

ID

Eng

Eng

Lit

Lit

Art

His

His

Soc

Lab

Lab

Sci

Mat

Psy

Com

GPA

1

9

12

9

9

12

12

12

9

4

12

16

3

12

12

3.18

2

9

12

12

12

6

6

6

12

12

8

9

6

9

9

2.91

3

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

16

8

12

12

9

12

3.75

4

12

12

12

12

6

6

6

12

9

12

16

12

12

12

3.36

5

12

6

12

9

9

9

6

6

8

8

9

9

9

9

2.75

6

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

16

16

16

12

12

12

4.00

7

12

9

9

9

12

9

12

6

13

9

9

9

12

12

3.35

8

9

9

6

6

6

9

6

12

8

12

9

6

6

9

2.57

9

12

9

6

9

12

6

9

12

12

12

12

3

12

9

3.00

10

12

12

9

9

12

9

9

9

12

12

9

12

9

9

3.27

11

12

9

12

12

12

9

12

12

12

8

16

9

9

12

3.47

12

6

12

9

12

6

12

12

3

12

12

9

9

6

9

2.93

13

6

9

9

3

9

12

12

6

16

8

12

6

12

9

2.87

14

9

9

6

12

9

9

6

9

16

16

12

6

9

9

3.04

15

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

9

16

16

9

12

12

12

3.86

16

9

9

6

9

12

9

6

9

16

8

12

9

6

9

2.93

17

9

6

9

9

9

6

6

6

12

10

6

6

9

9

2.55

18

12

12

9

12

12

12

12

12

8

12

12

9

12

12

3.59

19

9

9

6

9

9

6

9

12

9

16

6

6

12

9

2.89

20

6

9

6

12

6

9

6

9

8

8

12

9

9

9

2.68

21

12

12

12

9

12

12

9

12

16

12

12

6

9

12

3.57

22

12

12

12

12

12

9

3

12

16

16

16

9

12

12

3.67

23

12

12

9

12

12

12

12

9

12

12

12

12

9

12

3.61

24

12

9

12

6

12

9

12

9

11

11

6

6

9

12

3.09

25

9

9

9

9

12

9

9

9

8

8

12

6

12

9

2.95

26

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

16

16

16

12

12

12

4.00

27

12

9

9

9

12

9

6

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

3.33

28

9

9

12

9

12

6

9

9

16

12

16

12

9

12

3.38

29

6

6

6

6

9

9

6

12

16

12

8

6

6

9

2.60

30

12

9

9

9

12

6

6

9

10

16

16

6

9

12

3.13

31

9

6

9

9

12

6

6

6

11

10

6

9

6

6

2.52

32

9

9

9

12

9

9

9

6

8

4

12

9

12

9

2.80

33

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

16

16

16

12

12

12

4.00

34

9

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

16

9

9

12

3.62

35

6

12

9

9

6

12

12

9

16

12

9

12

6

9

3.16

36

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

16

16

16

12

12

12

4.00

37

6

9

9

9

12

12

6

9

15

16

12

9

12

9

3.30

38

6

9

6

12

6

6

9

9

8

12

9

9

9

9

2.70

39

9

9

9

9

9

6

6

9

8

12

8

9

6

9

2.62

40

 

9

9

12

12

9

9

12

16

12

16

12

12

9

3.35

41

9

6

9

6

12

3

9

6

12

16

6

3

12

9

2.68

42

6

9

6

6

9

6

6

12

8

8

9

9

9

12

2.61

43

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

16

12

12

12

12

12

3.82

44

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

9

16

16

12

12

12

12

3.84

45

12

9

12

9

12

12

9

12

8

8

12

6

9

9

3.09

46

9

9

9

9

12

6

9

6

12

16

13

6

9

9

2.98

47

9

9

12

12

12

9

12

9

8

12

12

12

12

12

3.45

48

6

6

9

9

9

12

6

12

8

9

6

6

6

6

2.50

49

12

6

12

6

12

9

9

12

16

16

9

9

12

6

3.32

50

6

6

6

9

12

6

6

6

12

16

9

9

9

12

2.82

51

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

16

9

3

12

9

3.57

52

6

9

6

6

12

6

9

9

9

8

9

9

12

6

2.64

53

12

9

12

12

12

9

12

9

14

15

12

12

6

12

3.59

54

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

16

12

12

12

12

12

4.00

55

9

12

9

9

12

6

6

12

12

4

9

6

9

12

2.89

56

6

12

9

9

6

6

6

12

13

16

6

12

12

12

3.11

57

12

12

9

12

12

12

12

12

16

16

16

12

12

12

3.93

58

9

12

9

12

12

12

12

12

16

16

16

12

12

12

3.87

59

12

12

12

9

12

12

12

9

16

10

9

12

12

12

3.58

60

9

9

12

12

12

12

9

12

12

16

12

12

12

12

3.70

61

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

16

16

12

12

12

12

3.91

62

9

12

12

12

9

9

9

12

16

13

15

12

9

12

3.58

63

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

9

12

12

3.67

64

6

9

6

12

9

12

3

12

8

12

12

6

6

12

2.84

65

9

9

9

9

12

6

6

9

12

16

12

12

9

12

3.23

66

9

9

6

12

12

6

3

6

8

12

11

6

9

6

2.56

67

6

9

12

6

9

9

12

6

4

12

9

9

6

6

2.61

68

9

6

12

6

12

9

3

9

4

8

12

6

9

9

2.53

69

9

9

12

12

9

9

9

12

16

12

16

9

12

12

3.51

70

6

6

9

9

9

6

6

12

8

4

8

12

9

12

2.58

71

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

16

16

12

12

12

12

4.00

72

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

16

16

16

12

12

12

4.00

73

6

9

9

9

12

9

6

12

8

8

9

6

12

9

2.82

74

9

9

12

12

9

12

9

12

8

12

12

9

9

6

3.11

75

6

6

12

6

12

3

6

12

12

8

9

9

9

6

2.64

76

12

9

12

6

9

12

12

12

16

12

12

6

12

9

3.36

77

12

12

6

3

9

12

12

12

8

4

16

6

12

12

3.02

78

9

6

6

6

12

6

6

9

12

8

12

12

9

6

2.64

79

9

12

12

12

12

6

12

9

15

15

6

9

12

12

3.48

80

9

9

12

12

6

12

9

12

16

16

12

6

12

9

3.38

81

12

12

12

12

12

9

9

12

8

16

12

12

12

12

3.60

82

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

16

16

12

9

12

12

3.93

83

9

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

16

16

16

12

6

12

3.80

84

9

9

9

6

9

9

6

9

12

12

9

9

9

9

2.86

85

6

12

9

9

9

9

6

9

8

12

8

9

9

9

2.76

86

12

12

9

9

12

6

6

12

8

16

12

6

9

12

3.13

87

6

12

6

9

12

12

6

9

12

10

9

12

9

9

3.02

88

6

6

6

9

9

6

9

6

16

16

9

9

6

9

2.77

89

12

12

9

12

12

12

9

6

12

8

12

9

12

12

3.31

90

6

9

6

9

6

9

6

12

8

8

4

12

9

9

2.51

91

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

16

16

12

12

12

3.91

92

9

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

16

16

12

9

12

12

3.86

93

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

16

16

12

12

12

9

3.84

94

9

12

12

9

12

9

12

9

8

8

8

6

9

12

3.00

95

12

12

9

12

12

12

9

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

3.60

96

6

9

9

9

9

12

12

9

8

8

12

6

9

6

2.76

97

6

6

9

12

12

6

6

12

8

12

8

9

6

9

2.69

 

3.16

3.32

3.28

3.32

3.57

3.15

3.02

3.40

3.03

3.02

3.22

3.04

3.35

3.43

3.23

 

There were five students admitted to the School of Education in English Education. The content knowledge core for English Education was as follows: English/Literature 3.8; Art 4.00; Social Sciences 3.8; Science/Mathematics/Psychology 3.78; Communications 4.0; Foreign Language 4.0 with an overall G.P.A. in 3.81. See Table 1.4.

 

Table 1.4 Content Knowledge G.P.A. Core Curriculum – English Education

 

 

ID

Eng

Eng

Lit

Lit

Art

His

His

Soc

Sci

Mat

Psy

Com

Lang

Lang

GPA

 

1

12

12

12

12

12

9

9

12

16

12

12

12

12

12

3.87

 

2

9

6

12

12

12

9

12

6

16

9

12

12

12

12

3.47

 

3

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

15

12

12

12

12

12

3.72

 

4

12

12

9

12

12

12

12

9

12

9

12

12

12

12

3.98

 

5

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

16

12

12

12

12

12

4.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.8

3.6

3.8

4

4

3.7

3.7

3.4

3.75

3.6

4

4

4

4

3.81

 

                                   

 

 

1a.4. What do follow-up studies of graduates and employers indicate about graduates' preparation in the content area? If survey data are being reported, what was the response rate?

 

Follow-up surveys of graduates and employers indicate that our graduates our well prepared in terms of content knowledge. Mississippi Department of Education (MDE) Annual Performance Survey and candidate exit surveys are two primary data sources which support this assertion.

 

The MDE Annual Performance Survey is required each year pursuant to the mandate of House Bill 609. The Department of Education conducts this survey with all principals and first year teachers in the state. The data is analyzed by teacher preparation programs including traditional undergraduate programs and alternate route programs. The unit along with every university in the state receives the annual performance report documenting seven MDE Educator standards:

Standard One-Planning and Preparation (9 indicators);

Standard Two-Communication and Interaction (6 indicators);

Standard Three-Teaching for Learning (8 indicators);

Standard Four-Management of the Learning Environment (6 indicators);

Standard Five-Assessment of Student Learning (4 indicators); and

Standard Six- General (2 indicators).

 

There were 211 WCU first year teachers evaluated by their principals in the 2009-2010 report. Of these, 50 were traditional preparation undergraduates and 161 alternate route MAT graduates.

 

On the MDE Annual Performance Survey initial candidates performed well on Section One (Planning and Preparation) with 96% principals agreeing that completers of our initial program knew content for their subject area and were able to plan adequately for all students. See Table 1.5.

 

Table 1.5. Mississippi Department of Education Annual Performance Report 2009

Principals on Traditionally Prepared Teachers Graduated from William Carey University

 

 

MDE Standard One - PLANNING AND PREPARATION

Agree %

Indicators

 

1-Teacher select developmentally appropriate objectives for lessons based on state frameworks and best practices.

100

2-The teacher plans appropriate teaching procedures.

100

3-The teacher selects a variety of appropriate materials and technology for lessons.

98

4-The teacher prepares materials and procedures for assessing learner progress.

98

5-The teacher uses assessment information to plan differentiated learning experiences that accommodate differences in developmental and/or educational needs.

100

6-The teacher uses knowledge of students’ backgrounds, interests, experiences, and prior knowledge (i.e., pretests, learning styles inventories, interest inventories, multiple intelligences surveys, and KWLs) to make instruction relevant and meaningful.

96

7-The teacher integrates knowledge from several subject areas in lessons.

100

8-The teacher incorporates diversity, including multicultural perspectives, into lessons.

100

9-The teacher uses a variety of strategies to introduce and close lessons.

100

Agree/Disagree

96%/4%

 

 

 

MDE Standard Two - Communication and Interaction

Agree %

Indicators

 

10-The teacher uses acceptable written, oral, and nonverbal communication.

98

11-The teacher provides clear, complete written and/or oral directions for instructional activities.

100

12-The teacher communicates high expectations for learning to all students.

100

13-The teacher projects enthusiasm for teaching and learning.

100

14-The teacher provides opportunities for the students to cooperate, communicate, and interact with each other to enhance learning.

100

15-The teacher establishes opportunities for communication with parents and/or guardians (i.e., newsletters, positive notes, extracurricular activities.

100

Agree/Disagree

99%/1%

 

Table 1.5 continued next page.

 

Table 1.5. Continued

 

 

MDE Standard Three - Teaching For Learning

Agree %

Indicators

 

16-The teacher demonstrates knowledge of the subjects being taught.

100

17-The teacher uses a variety of appropriate teaching strategies (i.e., cooperative learning, discovery learning, demonstration, discussion, inquiry, simulation).

100

18-The teacher provides learning experiences that accommodate differences in development and individual needs.

100

19-The teacher provides opportunities for students to apply concepts in problem solving and critical thinking.

100

20-The teacher elicits and responds to student input during instruction.

100

21-The teacher probes, allows sufficient and equitable wait time, and encourages students to expand and support their responses.

100

22-The teacher uses higher-order questions to engage students in analytic, creative, and critical thinking.

100

23-The teacher uses family and/or community resources (human and material) in lessons to enhance student learning.

100

Agree/Disagree

100%/0

 

 

 

MDE Standard Four – Management of the Learning Environment

Agree %

Indicators

 

24-The teacher monitors and adjusts the classroom environment to enhance social relationships, motivation, and learning.

100

25-The teacher adjusts lessons according to individual student cues, professional reflections, and group responses.

100

26-The teacher attends to or delegates routine tasks.

100

27-The teacher uses a variety of strategies to foster appropriate student behavior according to individual and situational needs.

100

28-The teacher demonstrates fairness and supportiveness in order to achieve a positive, interactive learning environment.

100

29-The teacher uses instructional time effectively, including delegation of routine tasks.

100

Agree/Disagree

100%/0

 

 

 

MDE Standard Five – Assessment of Student Learning

Agree %

Indicators

 

30-The teacher communicates assessment criteria and performance standards to the students.

100

31-The teacher develops and uses a variety of informal and formal assessments (i.e., pretests, quizzes, unit tests, remediation, and enrichment activities) to differentiate learning experiences that accommodates differences in developmental and/or educational needs.

100

32-The teacher provides timely feedback on students’ academic performance and discusses corrective procedures to be taken.

100

33-The teacher maintains records of student work and performance and appropriately communicates student progress.

100

Agree/Disagree

100%/0

 

 

 

MDE Standard Six – General

Agree %

Indicators

 

34-The teacher education program adequately equipped the teacher with the knowledge, skills, and dispositions to be a successful teacher.

100

35-The teacher is knowledgeable about state and federal regulations concerning instruction of students with special needs (i.e., IDEA, IEPs, accommodations, teacher-support teams, inclusion).

92

Agree/Disagree

94%/6%

 

The Mississippi Annual Performance Report also required principals to evaluate all first year M.A.T. Alternate Route teachers who are admitted to the William Carey University program. Of the 162 alternate route teachers evaluated, 116 are Carey graduate students making our M.A.T. program the largest in the state. See Table 1.6. The Annual Report indicates very strong positive ratings for all categories ranging from 91.5% to 99.1%. The lowest rating (91.5%) is about knowledge of state and federal regulations concerning instruction of students with special needs (i.e., IDEA, IEPs, accommodations, teacher-support teams, inclusion). This remains a key focus for all faculty members when refining their pedagogy courses.

 

Table 1.6. Mississippi Annual Performance Report 2009

Principal’s Evaluation M.A.T. Alternate Route Prepared Teachers throughout the State

 

 

MDE Standard One - PLANNING AND PREPARATION

Agree %

Indicators

116 teachers

1-Teacher select developmentally appropriate objectives for lessons based on state frameworks and best practices.

100

2-The teacher plans appropriate teaching procedures.

100

3-The teacher selects a variety of appropriate materials and technology for lessons.

100

4-The teacher prepares materials and procedures for assessing learner progress.

99.5

5-The teacher uses assessment information to plan differentiated learning experiences that accommodate differences in developmental and/or educational needs.

98

6-The teacher uses knowledge of students’ backgrounds, interests, experiences, and prior knowledge (i.e., pretests, learning styles inventories, interest inventories, multiple intelligences surveys, and KWLs) to make instruction relevant and meaningful.

96

7-The teacher integrates knowledge from several subject areas in lessons.

94

8-The teacher incorporates diversity, including multicultural perspectives, into lessons.

92

9-The teacher uses a variety of strategies to introduce and close lessons.

98

Agree/Disagree

97.5%/2.5%

 

 

 

MDE Standard Two - Communication and Interaction

Agree %

Indicators

 

10-The teacher uses acceptable written, oral, and nonverbal communication.

100

11-The teacher provides clear, complete written and/or oral directions for instructional activities.

99.7

12-The teacher communicates high expectations for learning to all students.

100

13-The teacher projects enthusiasm for teaching and learning.

100

14-The teacher provides opportunities for the students to cooperate, communicate, and interact with each other to enhance learning.

99.5

15-The teacher establishes opportunities for communication with parents and/or guardians (i.e., newsletters, positive notes, extracurricular activities.

94

Agree/Disagree

98.6%/1.4%

 

 

 

MDE Standard Three - Teaching For Learning

Agree %

Indicators

 

16-The teacher demonstrates knowledge of the subjects being taught.

99.8

17-The teacher uses a variety of appropriate teaching strategies (i.e., cooperative learning, discovery learning, demonstration, discussion, inquiry, simulation).

100

18-The teacher provides learning experiences that accommodate differences in development and individual needs.

98

19-The teacher provides opportunities for students to apply concepts in problem solving and critical thinking.

97.6

20-The teacher elicits and responds to student input during instruction.

100

21-The teacher probes, allows sufficient and equitable wait time, and encourages students to expand and support their responses.

99.8

22-The teacher uses higher-order questions to engage students in analytic, creative, and critical thinking.

94

23-The teacher uses family and/or community resources (human and material) in lessons to enhance student learning.

84

Agree/Disagree

97.6%/2.4%

 

 

 

 

 

 

MDE Standard Four – Management of the Learning Environment

Agree %

Indicators

 

24-The teacher monitors and adjusts the classroom environment to enhance social relationships, motivation, and learning.

99.8

25-The teacher adjusts lessons according to individual student cues, professional reflections, and group responses.

100

26-The teacher attends to or delegates routine tasks.

98.5

27-The teacher uses a variety of strategies to foster appropriate student behavior according to individual and situational needs.

99.8

28-The teacher demonstrates fairness and supportiveness in order to achieve a positive, interactive learning environment.

100

29-The teacher uses instructional time effectively, including delegation of routine tasks.

97

Agree/Disagree

99.1%/0.9%

 

 

 

MDE Standard Five – Assessment of Student Learning

Agree %

Indicators

 

30-The teacher communicates assessment criteria and performance standards to the students.

99.8

31-The teacher develops and uses a variety of informal and formal assessments (i.e., pretests, quizzes, unit tests, remediation, and enrichment activities) to differentiate learning experiences that accommodates differences in developmental and/or educational needs.

98.4

32-The teacher provides timely feedback on students’ academic performance and discusses corrective procedures to be taken.

97.1

33-The teacher maintains records of student work and performance and appropriately communicates student progress.

99.8

Agree/Disagree

98.7%/1.3%

 

 

 

MDE Standard Six – General

Agree %

Indicators

 

34-The teacher education program adequately equipped the teacher with the knowledge, skills, and dispositions to be a successful teacher.

92

35-The teacher is knowledgeable about state and federal regulations concerning instruction of students with special needs (i.e., IDEA, IEPs, accommodations, teacher-support teams, inclusion).

91

Agree/Disagree

91.5%/8.5%

 

 

The survey of Intern Perceptions is conducted at the end of the second term of the internship. This allows the unit to judge program satisfaction and encourages new initiatives in program development. The Survey is a five point Likert scale with 5 being the highest. The Student Learning Outcome for the unit was an overall mean of 3.5. The interns’ sense of preparation has concerned the unit (3.27) and caused the faculty to partner with the North Pike Elementary School to create the Super Summer Showcase of First Year Teachers. These eight master teachers have designed a handbook and seminars to help teacher candidates to be more comfortable with the challenges of building their first classroom. See Table 1.7.

 

 

 

Table 1.7 EDU 635 Internship Survey

 

 

Survey of Intern Perceptions

Indicators

 

1. How prepared were you, in a technical sense (grading, developing tests, managing students, etc.), for your first year of teaching?

3.27

 

2. How prepared were you in relation to other new teachers in your school/district?

3.84

 

3. How satisfied are you with your decision to enter the teaching profession?

4.36

 

4. How helpful/supportive were other more experienced teachers at your school/ in your district?

3.84

 

5. How helpful/supportive was your school administrative staff (at the school where you are employed)?

3.96

 

6. Do you feel you received enough support (visits, school site mentor, seminars, etc.) from EDU 635 instructors?

4.45

 

7. Are you satisfied with your pre-teaching courses (EDU 536 Classroom Management and EDU 650 Tests, Measurements, Evaluation)?

4.21

 

Total

3.99

*The ratings were based on a 1-5 scale with one being the lowest and five the highest.

 

 

1b. Pedagogical Content Knowledge and Skills for Teacher Candidates.

 

An example of pedagogical performance skills is assessed in EDU 440 Kindergarten Practicum which is one of the Elementary Education’s laboratory classes. See Table 1.8.

 

Student Learning Outcome: In the One Week Unit Rubric, all indicators except for Synthesis of Knowledge (57%) exceeded the target of 85%. In the Big Book Presentation, all indicators were met at 85% or higher. The S.L.O. was reached. The Phonemic Awareness Lesson indicators also met the S.L.O.

 

BIG BOOK PRESENTATION – The “Big Book Presentation” has the following Student Learning Outcome: 85% of the students will achieve a minimum of 3 on a 4 point Likert Scale on each indicator. All indicators - “Materials Ready” (94.4), “Enthusiasm” (94.4), “Standard English” (88.9), “Appropriate Closure” (94.4), “Professional Dress” (94.9) – met the Student Learning Outcome goal. The assessment serves as an important tool to assess student candidate teaching performance and will continue through 2008-2009.

 

PHONEMIC AWARENESS LESSON PRESENTATION - The “Phonemic Awareness Lesson Presentation” has the following Student Learning Outcome: 85% of the students will achieve a minimum of 3 on a 4 point Likert Scale on each indicator. All indicators - “Materials Ready” (89.4), “State Frameworks” (94.7), “Instructional Strategies (89.4), “Closure” (94.7), and “Professional Manner” (94.7) - met the Learning Outcome goal. The assessment tool will continue through 2008-2009 due to its importance in establishing student candidate teaching performance.

 

 

Table 1.8 Pedagogical Performance Skills in Elementary Education

 

 

Indicators

4

All Indicators Evident

Percentage

3

Most Indicators Evident

Percentage

2

Some Indicators Evident

Percentage

1

Insufficient Indicators Evident

Percentage

One Week Unit Rubric

1. Organization

 

 

61

 

39

 

 

2. Synthesis of Knowledge Based on MDE-K Guidelines

 

 

43

 

14

 

43

 

3. Learning Centers

 

62

 

33

5

 

4. Assessments

 

71

 

24

5

 

 

5. Resources Listed

 

48

 

43

 

9

 

Big Book Presentation Rubric

1 Materials Ready

 

100

 

 

 

2. Enthusiasm

 

100

 

 

 

 

3. Standard English

 

 

100

 

 

 

 

4. Appropriate Closure

 

86

 

14

 

 

5. Professional Dress

 

100

 

 

 

Phonemic Awareness Lesson Presentation Rubric

1. Materials Ready

 

 

100

 

 

 

 

 

2. State Framework

 

100

 

 

 

 

3. Instructional Strategies

 

95

 

5

 

 

4. Closure

 

91

 

9

 

 

5. Professional Manner

 

95

5

 

 

 

 

Content knowledge aligned with pedagogy throughout the programs is reflected by the following example (Physical Education K-12). The overall Content Knowledge G.P.A. among Physical Education students is 3.44. See Table 1.9. This same analysis is being completed for all programs.

 

 

 

Table 1.9 Pedagogical Courses for Physical Education – G.P.A.

 

 

Student

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

GPA

PED 231

 

A=4

B=3

B=3

A=4

B=3

A=4

 

 

3.50

PED 324

 

 

B=3

B=3

 

C=2

 

B=3

 

2.75

PED 336

 

 

 

 

B=3

B=3

A=4

 

 

3.33

PED 436

 

 

 

 

A=4

B=3

B=3

 

A=4

3.50

PED 432

A=4

A=4

A=4

A=4

A=4

A=4

B=3

A=4

 

3.88

HEA 300

B=3

A=4

A=4

 

C=2

A=4

A=4

C=2

 

3.28

HEA 323

 

A=4

B=3

 

B=3

A=4

B=3

A=4

 

3.50

PED 331

 

A=4

 

 

 

B=3

A=4

 

 

3.67

PED 333

 

 

 

B=3

A=4

A=4

A=4

A=4

 

3.80

PED 437

B=3

A=4

B=3

 

A=4

A=4

C=2

B=3

 

3.28

HEA 230

 

 

A=4

B=3

B=3

A=4

 

 

 

3.50

PED 337

 

A=4

 

 

B=3

B=3

B=3

 

 

3.25

PED 339

 

A=4

 

 

A=4

B=3

A=4

 

 

3.75

PED 433

 

 

C=2

A=4

B=3

A=4

B=3

 

 

3.20

 

3.3

4.00

3.25

3.33

3.41

3.43

3.42

3.33

4.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.44

 

1b.1. (Programs Not Nationally Reviewed) What data from key assessments indicate that candidates in initial teacher preparation programs demonstrate the pedagogical content knowledge and skills delineated in professional, state, and institutional standards? [Data for initial teacher preparation programs that have been nationally reviewed or reviewed through a similar state review do not have to be reported here. Summarize data here only for programs not already reviewed. A table summarizing these data could be attached at Prompt 1b.4 below.]

 

All initial teacher preparation programs are under national review, except for Speech Communication with no candidates in three years and Art Education with no candidates in three years.

 

 

 

1b.2. (Programs Not Nationally Reviewed) What data from key assessments indicate that advanced teacher candidates know and apply theories related to pedagogy and learning, are able to use a range of instructional strategies and technologies, and can explain the choices they make in their practice.

 

The Comprehensive Examination is a key assessment used across all M.Ed. programs based on the following standards:

  • Standard One - Advanced graduate teachers know and apply theories related to pedagogy and learning;
  • Standard Two – Advanced graduate teachers are able to use a range of instructional strategies and technologies;
  • Standard Three – Advanced graduate teachers can explain the choices they make in their practice.

Comprehensive examinations are administered in July, November, and April. Refer to Table 1.2 to see the alignment of standards and the scores on the comprehensive examinations.

 

 

Technology skills are a critical component across the M.Ed. graduate programs. EDU 625 Technology in Education is the course that assesses technology skills with graduate students. The Student Learning Outcome for technology performance skills is 3.5 or higher on a 4 point Likert scale. See Table 1.10. The S.L.O. was met in all areas. The first performance competency deals with Curriculum Unit Development and Essential questions which scores 3.7.

 

 

Table 1.10 Technology Performance Competencies

 

 

Performance Competency – Intel Teach to the Future

 

Fall

 

1. Exploring Essential and Unit Questions

3.7

2. Copyright Laws Applications

3.6

3. Copyright Law Application

3.8

4. Creating a Works Cited Document – (Word)

3.9

5. Using Directories and Search Engines

3.9

6. Locating Internet Resources

3.5

7. Creating A Multimedia Presentation (Powerpoint)

3.9

8. Creating a Student Publication (Publisher)

3.9

9. Managing Computer Files

3.5

10. Creating Student Support Materials

3.6

11. Planning a Student

3.5

12. Creating a Student Website

3.5

13. Using Email and the Internet

3.9

14. Creating Management Documents

3.7

15. Locating Internet Resources for Educators

3.7

16. Creating Access Databases

3.9

17. Working with Excel Databases

3.9

 

 

 

1b.3. What do follow-up studies of graduates and employers indicate about graduates' preparation in pedagogical content knowledge and skills? If survey data have not already been reported, what was the response rate?

 

The MDE Annual Performance Report shows that there were 211 WCU first year teachers evaluated by their principals in the 2009-2010 report. Of these, 50 were traditional preparation undergraduates and 161 alternate route MAT graduates. The traditionally prepared teachers represented by the attached table attached (Traditionally Prepared Teachers Graduated from WCU) scored as follows in the major categories:

 

1-Planning and Preparation 96%,

2-Communication and Interaction 99%,

3-Teaching for Learning 100%,

4-Management of the Learning Environment 100%,

5-Assessment of Student Learning 100%, and

6-General 94%.

 

Items #2(100%), 3(98%), 4(98%), 5(100%), 6(96%), 7(100%), 10(98%), 12 (100%), and 16(100%) specifically support candidate pedagogical content knowledge and skills. See Table 1.5 for traditionally prepared Teachers.

 

The Mississippi Annual Performance Review is quite similar when principals evaluated first year alternate route teachers enrolled in their internship. Their evaluations represented by Table 1.6 scored as follows in the major categories:

1-Planning and Preparation 97%,

2-Communication and Interaction 98%,

3-Teaching for Learning 98%,

4-Management of the Learning Environment 99%,

5-Assessment of Student Learning 98%, and

6-General 91%.

 

Items #2(100%), 3(100%), 4(99%), 5(98%), 6(96%), 7(94%), 10(100%), 12 (100%), and 16(99%) specifically support candidate pedagogical content knowledge and skills. See Table 1.6 for Alternate Route Teachers.

 

The Annual Performance Report is a very powerful assessment tool since these are outside evaluators evaluating first year teachers. The unit cites this report as a strong evaluation of the effectiveness of Carey education graduates as educators.

 

The Graduate Programs Survey is conducted annually in the spring and provides essential data on program satisfaction on the part of graduate students currently in eight graduate programs. See Table 1.11 for the full report. The unit’s program goal was 3.7 or higher in each category. All categories were met except for Art (Availability of Classes 2.0; Faculty Expertise 3.0; Facilities 3.0) and M.Ed. in Mild and Moderate Disabilities (Research Skills 3.5). The unit’s programs with the strongest ratings were M.Ed. Elementary Education, Specialist in Elementary Education, M.Ed. in Secondary Education, and M.A.T. Secondary Education with a rating of 4.0 or higher in every category.

 

 

 

Table 1.11 Graduate Programs Survey Spring 2010

Quality of Program 1=Strongly disagree 2=Disagree 3=Neither Agree/ Disagree 4=Agree 5=Strongly Agree

 

 

Program Categories

M.Ed. Elem

N=11

MAT Elem

N=15

Spec

N=3

Art 
N=1

Gifted

N=11

Mild

Mod

N=2

M.ED

Sec

N=35

MAT sec

N=24

1- Advisor Guidance

4.1

4.7

5.0

5.0

4.4

5.0

4.1

4.0

2-Faculty Expertise

4.1

4.5

5.0

3.0

3.9

5.0

4.4

4.6

3-Library

4.3

3.7

5.0

5.0

3.7

4.0

4.3

4.3

4-Facilities

4.3

3.9

4.7

3.0

4.1

5.0

4.6

4.6

5-Technology

4.2

4.0

5.0

5.0

4.1

5.0

4.6

4.7

6-Best Practices

4.2

4.0

5.0

3.0

4.2

4.5

4.4

4.4

7-Scholarly Writing

4.2

3.7

5.0

5.0

4.4

4.0

4.5

4.6

8-Research Skills

4.2

3.9

5.0

5.0

4.4

3.5

4.4

4.6

9-Class Availability

4.4

3.9

5.0

2.0

4.0

5.0

4.6

4.5

10-Individual Needs

4.2

3.8

5.0

4.0

4.2

4.0

4.5

4.5

11- Application

4.2

3.9

5.0

5.0

4.1

4.5

4.6

4.8

12-Mission

4.1

3.9

5.0

5.0

4.2

4.5

4.5

4.7

13- Diversity

4.3

4.1

5.0

5.0

4.3

4.0

4.3

4.9

 

The Undergraduate Programs Survey was administered at the same time as the Graduate Surveys. This data is analyzed and used to make unit and university decisions about facilities, programs, resources, and future action projects. All programs met the unit’s learning goal of 3.7 or higher in every category (exception is the Music Education Program with only one respondent).

 

Table 1.12 Undergraduate Programs Survey Spring Hattiesburg Campus

Quality of Program 1=Strongly disagree 2=Disagree 3=Neither Agree/ Disagree 4=Agree 5=Strongly Agree

 

 

Program Categories

Art

EDUC

N=2

Elem

Educ

N=94

English

EDU

N=6

Music Educ

N=1

Physical

Educ

N=24

Social

Studies

N=3

1- Advisor Guidance

5.0

4.1

3.8

5.0

4.2

4.0

2-Faculty Expertise

5.0

4.5

4.8

5.0

3.7

4.0

3-Library

4.5

4.2

4.2

1.0

4.0

4.0

4-Facilities

4.5

4.4

4.8

5.0

3.9

4.0

5-Technology .

4.5

4.4

4.7

5.0

4.1

4.3

6-Best Practices

5.0

4.3

4.8

5.0

4.0

4.3

7-Educator Preparation

5.0

4.4

4.3

5.0

4.0

4.0

8-Skills Demonstration

4.5

4.3

3.8

1.0

4.0

3.7

9-Class Availability

3.0

4.0

4.2

4.0

3.8

4.0

10-Individual Needs

5.0

4.3

4.2

3.0

3.9

4.3

11- Student Teaching

---

3.8

5.0

--

3.5

4.5

12-Mission

5.0

4.5

4.7

5.0

3.8

4.3

13- Diversity

5.0

4.5

4.3

5.0

4.0

4.3

*Cells with no data indicate students who have not completed student teaching.

 

 

 

Master’s Programs Survey

Student Learning Outcome: Graduate students completing the Master’s of Education program will rate their programs and the resulting professional preparation at 4.25 on a 5 point Likert scale.

 

 

Indicators

 

Scholarly Excellence

1-Faculty in my program held high expectations for my performance.

4.6

2-My professors encouraged me to participate in professional organizations.

3.2

3-Different scholarly points of view were encouraged.

4.6

4-Faculty members prepared carefully for their courses.

4.6

Environment for Learning

5-I have had the opportunity to engage in collaborative work with students in my program.

4.9

6-My program fostered a sense of intellectual community.

4.8

7-My program supported my professional goals.

4.8

8-The academic advising that I received was timely and accurate.

4.7

Faculty Concern for Students

9-Faculty in my program served as positive role models.

4.9

10-Faculty in my program were receptive to new ideas and ways of doing things.

4.8

11-I received honest, useful feedback from faculty on my class performance.

4.8

Perceptions of Preparation

12-I feel well prepared in my area of specialization.

4.7

13-I feel well prepared to carry out my professional responsibilities.

4.8

14-I feel well prepared to assume a leadership position.

4.8

15-I am confident in my ability to use appropriate

4.9

TOTAL INDICATORS

4.66

     

SACS NCATE MDE\Surveys Rubrics\2008 09\2008 09 Master Program Survey Gulf

Student Learning Outcome: The S.L.O. was exceeded in every indicator except for Indicator 2 (Professional Organizations – 3.2). The Total Indicators show that the S.L.O. was met.

 

 

1c. Professional and Pedagogical Knowledge and Skills for Teacher Candidates

 

1c.1. What data from key assessments indicate that candidates in initial teacher preparation and advanced teacher preparation programs demonstrate the professional and pedagogical knowledge and skills delineated in professional, state, and institutional standards to facilitate learning?

 

Initial candidates’ professional and pedagogical knowledge and skills are evidenced through their performance on the TIAI (includes cooperating teacher and university supervisor evaluations), mentor teacher surveys (MAT programs), follow-up studies (undergraduate), employer surveys (MAT), and MDE Annual Performance Report data.

 

 

 

 

 

1c.2. What data from key assessments indicate that candidates in initial teacher preparation programs consider the school, family, and community contexts and the prior experiences of students; reflect on their own practice; know major schools of thought about schooling, teaching, and learning; and can analyze educational research findings? If a licensure test is required in this area, how are candidates performing on it?

 

Initial candidates’ professional and pedagogical knowledge and skills are evidenced through their performance on the TIAI (includes cooperating teacher and university supervisor evaluations), mentor teacher surveys (MAT programs), follow-up studies (undergraduate), employer surveys (MAT), and MDE Annual Performance Report data.

 

The TIAI is divided into five major TIAI competencies (Planning and Preparation, Communication and Interaction, Teaching for Learning, Management of the Learning Environment, and Assessment of Student Learning) with 34 performance indicators. TIAI items #5, 6, 8, 14, 15, 23, 24, and 25 show that candidates are competent in professional and pedagogical knowledge. The MDE Annual Performance Report items #13, 14, 15, 17, 19, 21, 23, and 24 further support the data.

 

The overall score for undergraduate teacher education candidates on the PLT was 165, 13 points above the state cut score. In the following six assessment categories of the PLT 99 examinees average score was as follows compared to state and national averages:

 

Students As Learners:

1-Develop, Diverse Learners, Motivation, Environment (School 73, State 71, National 76);

2-Instruction & Assessment-Instructional / Assessment Strategies (School 71, State 75, National 79); 3-Teacher Professionalism-Reflective Practitioner, Larger Community (Schl 64, State 66, Nation 73); 4-Students as Learners-Case Histories/ Short Answer Questions (School 64, State 66, National 73); 5-Communication Techniques – Short Answer Questions (School 62, State 66, National 72); and

6-Teacher Professionalism- Case Histories Questions (School 54, State 56, National 66).

 

In EDU 450 Tests, Measurements and Evaluations, the Student Learning Outcome is that 80% of the students will be able to obtain, summarize, and critique empirical information through the annotated bibliography model, obtaining a minimum of 80 out of 100 points on a rubric. This SLO is designed to train teacher candidates to analyze educational research. During the winter and spring the SLO was met across class sections. This faculty member continues to revise this course in order to update assessment information from the state and national resources. The one of the major goals of the course is to build research awareness for teacher candidates to assist them in evaluating educational research and to become a consumer of educational research.

 

 

 

 

 

1c.3. What data from key assessments indicate that advanced teacher candidates reflect on their practice; engage in professional activities; have a thorough understanding of the school, family, and community contexts in which they work; collaborate with the professional community; are aware of current research and policies related to schooling, teaching, learning, and best practices; and can analyze educational research and policies and explain the implications for their own practice and the profession?

 

In the advanced programs unit plans, lesson demonstrations, and essays/critiques show that candidates understand school, family, and community context, reflect upon their practice, analyze and incorporate new information, collaborate with the professional community, and are aware of research and policies.

 

 

 

1c.4. What do follow-up studies of graduates and employers indicate about graduates' preparation related to professional and pedagogical knowledge and skills? If survey data have not already been reported, what was the response rate?

 

The MAT Principal Evaluation of the Intern is a survey conducted by the SOE with all principals who are supervising MAT interns during their first year of teaching. This survey is critically important since it is an external survey of our advanced graduate teacher preparation program. The Principal’s Evaluation has twenty indicators using a four point Likert scale:

• 4-Outstanding, Effective Practice

• 3-Acceptable, Safe to Practice

• 2-Marginally Acceptable Practice

• 1-Ineffective, Unacceptable Practice.

The following indicators demonstrate proficiency in professional and pedagogical knowledge and skills as rated by principals:

 

Indicator 3- Demonstrates subject area competence throughout internship (Outstanding 70.83%, Acceptable 27.08%);

 

Indicator 10-Effectively and efficiently incorporates appropriate classroom procedures (Outstanding 70.83%, Acceptable 25%);

 

Indicator 14-Uses learning theories appropriate to age/development/ability of students (Outstanding 66.67%, Acceptable 27.08%);

 

Indicator 17-Regularly provides anticipatory set and closure to lessons (Outstanding 54.17%, Acceptable 41.67%);

 

Indicator 18-Demonstrates initiative and creativity and seeks to improve teaching (Outstanding 66.67%, Acceptable 29.17%);

 

Indicator 19-Demonstrates ability to diagnose student needs and measure student performance according to established criteria and based on objectives (Outstanding 60.42%, Acceptable 35.42%).

 

The unit’s student learning outcome was that 90% of the interns evaluated by principals would score 3 or higher on each indicator. The student learning outcome was met with all indicators; the range of scores being 93.75 to 97.91. It is the goal of the unit to increase intern pedagogical knowledge by revising EDU 636 to include a variety of action projects that will immediately be useful in the classroom to improve student learning effectiveness.

 

 

 

1d. Student Learning for Teacher Candidates

 

1d.1. (Programs Not Nationally Reviewed) What data from key assessments indicate that candidates in initial teacher preparation programs can assess and analyze student learning, make appropriate adjustments to instruction, monitor student learning, and develop and implement meaningful learning experiences to help all students learn?

 

All initial teacher preparation programs are under national review, except for Speech Communication with no candidates in three years and Art Education with no candidates in three years.

 

 

 

1d.2. (Programs Not Nationally Reviewed) What data from key assessments indicate that advanced teacher candidates demonstrate a thorough understanding of the major concepts and theories related to assessing student learning; regularly apply them in their practice; analyze student, classroom, and school performance data; make data-driven decisions about strategies for teaching and learning; and are aware of and utilize school and community resources that support student learning?

 

In the advanced programs candidate scores on the Value Added Projects serve as a primary indicator that candidates can assess based upon objectives, analyze classroom and performance data, and develop action plans based off of this knowledge.

 

Additional Assessments such as the Annotated Bibliography in EDU 650, the … show an understanding of major concepts and theories related to assessing student learning and utilization of resources that support student learning …

 

 

1d.3. What do follow-up studies of graduates and employers indicate about graduates' ability to help all students learn? If survey data have not already been reported, what was the response rate?

 

The Mississippi Annual Performance Report has key indicators dealing with helping all students to learn:

Indicator 1-Teacher selects developmentally appropriate objectives (100% Alt Rt; 100% Traditional);

 

Indicator 2-The teacher plans appropriate teaching procedures (100% Alt Rt; 100% Traditional);

 

Indicator 5-The teacher uses assessment information to plan differentiated learning experiences that accommodate differences in developmental and/or educational needs (98% Alt Rt; 100% Traditional);

 

Indicator 6-The teacher uses knowledge of students’ backgrounds, interests, experiences, and prior knowledge to make instruction relevant and meaningful (96% Alt Rt; 96% Traditional)

 

 

1e. Knowledge and Skills for Other School Professionals

 

1e.1. What are the pass rates of other school professionals on licensure tests by program and across all programs (i.e., overall pass rate)?

 

Table 5

Pass Rates on Licensure Tests for Other School Professionals

 

 

 

 

N/A

For Period:

 

 

 

 

 

Program

 

Name of Licensure Test

 

# of Test Takers

% Passing State Licensure Test

Overall Pass Rate for the Unit (across all programs for the preparation of other

school professionals)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1e.2. (Programs Not Nationally Reviewed) What data from other key assessments indicate that other school professionals demonstrate the knowledge and skills delineated in professional, state, and institutional standards? [Data for programs for other school professionals that have been nationally reviewed or reviewed through a similar state review do not have to be reported here. Summarize data here only for programs not already reviewed. A table summarizing these data could be attached at Prompt 1e.4 below.]

 

N/A

 

 

 

3,000 characters

 

 

 

 

1e.3. What do follow-up studies of graduates and employers indicate about the knowledge and skills of other school professionals? If survey data are being reported, what was the response rate? [A table summarizing the results of follow-up studies related to knowledge and skills could be attached at Prompt 1e.4 below. The attached table could include all of the responses to your follow-up survey to which you could refer the reader in responses on follow-up studies in other elements of Standard 1.]

 

N/A

 

 

 

2,000 characters

 

 

 

 

1e.4. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to the knowledge and skills of other school professionals may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-5) should be uploaded.]

 

 

 

1f. Student Learning for Other School Professionals

 

1f.1. (Programs Not Nationally Reviewed) What data from key assessments indicate that candidates can create positive environments for student learning, including building on the developmental levels of students; the diversity of students, families, and communities; and the policy contexts within which they work? [Data for programs for other school professionals that have been nationally reviewed or reviewed through a similar state review do not have to be reported here. Summarize data here only for programs not already reviewed. A table summarizing these data could be attached at Prompt 1f.3 below.]

 

N/A

 

 

1f.2. What do follow-up studies of graduates and employers indicate about graduates' ability to create positive environments for student learning? If survey data have not already been reported, what was the response rate? [If these survey data are included in a previously attached table, refer the reader to that attachment; otherwise, a table summarizing the results of follow-up studies related to the ability to create positive environments for student leaning could be attached at Prompt 1f.3 below.]

 

N/A

 

 

1f.3. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to other school professionals' creation of positive environments for student learning may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-5) should be uploaded.]

 

1g. Professional Dispositions for All Candidates. [Indicate when the responses refer to the preparation of initial teacher candidates, advanced teacher candidates, and other school professionals, noting differences when they occur.]

 

1g.1. What professional dispositions are candidates expected to demonstrate by completion of programs?

 

Professional Dispositions are based on the unit’s conceptual framework to train caring, reflective decision-makers who can build a nurturing environment. The unit selected the INTASC standards as the basis for the development of the Professional Dispositions rubric. Candidates are expected to demonstrate professionalism through their teacher preparation program. Professionalism includes the way the candidates participate in the university classrooms and teaching experiences in schools. When students enter the School of Education, they are no longer students; they have become teacher candidates with all the expectations of a professional in the field. Professional dispositions are reviewed by advisors, professors, and the Professional Standards Committee, as well as supervisors and mentors in the field practica.

The professional dispositions align themselves under four categories:

 

I. Personal Integrity

1. Respect – shows respect toward others, deals with frustrations, problems, and differences in opinion in mature ways.

2. Dependability and Reliability – shows responsible attendance, arrives punctually for class and teaching experiences, completes assignments on time, and is organized and prepared.

3. Academic Honesty – takes responsibility for producing independent, original work.

II. Ability to Problem Solve and Design Learning Communities

1. Commitment and Initiative – takes assignments seriously, demonstrates commitment to learning and students rather than just completing assignments for a grade, and explores professional sources for new ideas.

2. Collaboration – helps create positive relationships in the university classroom and field experiences in schools, participates in the learning process by sharing diverse experiences and perspectives, participates productively in group activities, and establishes productive and professional relationships with professors and colleagues.

3. Knowledgeable – is aware of current educational issues, demonstrates an ability to illustrate and apply subject matter concepts.

4. Open-Mindedness – demonstrates a willingness to question both traditional and innovative practices in the quest for doing what is best for students and shows a willingness to be flexible when dealing with the uncertainty and complexity of educational issues.

5. Responsiveness – seeks and values constructive feedback from others (peers, instructors), and relates well with others.

III. Professional Behaviors

1. Confidentiality – reflects on information about students and specific classroom anecdotes in confidential and respectful ways and shares information only with those who need to know.

2. Appearance – dresses for all teaching experiences by following the dress code established by the school site.

3. Communication – demonstrates effective communication, models standard English in writing and speaking, and expresses thoughts clearly and succinctly.

IV. Differentiation in Instruction

1. Bias – engages in practices that recognize all students and encourages active student participation in activities and discussion that highlight the value of diversity and the richness of the student’s experience.

2. Fairness – engages in practices that recognize all students, and all students receive constructive feedback and encouragement.

3. Teaching Effectiveness – relates to and teaches students in ways that are developmentally appropriate, develops the ability to plan and to engage students in productive learning events that feature critical and insightful thinking, and demonstrates effective management skills.

 

The Professional Dispositions table describes the data. These dispositions are evaluated through courses, field practica and internship. The teacher candidates are introduced to the dispositions in EDU 300 Introduction to Education and are given opportunities to self-evaluate their level of professionalism.

 

The Teacher Internship Assessment Instrument (TIAI) is the in-field evaluation conducted by cooperating teachers in the field and university supervisors. There are indicators within the TIAI that focus on professional dispositions:

1) Indicator 17-Communicates high expectations for learning to all students.

2) Indicator 13-Conveys enthusiasm for the content being taught.

3) Indicator 18-Provides learning experiences that accommodate differences in developmental and individual needs of diverse learners.

4) Indicator 28-Demonstrates fairness and supportiveness in order achieve a positive interactive learning environment.

5) Indicator 16-Demonstrates knowledge of the subject taught.

6) Indicator 8-Incorporates diversity, including multicultural perspective into lessons.

7) Indicator 17-Uses appropriate teaching strategies.

8) Indicator 25-Adjusts lessons according to individual student cues, professional reflections, and group responses.

9) Indicator 32-Uses assessment information to differentiate learning and utilizes a variety of formal and informal assessments.

10) Indicator 34-Maintains records of student work and performance.

 

In the Advanced Graduate programs, other than initial licensure, the Professional Dispositions are evaluated through faculty observations and student work. The Professional Dispositions are the basis for the university learning community and its overall effectiveness. Graduate students encountering problems with a particular disposition (i.e. Academic Honesty, Reliability, etc) will be required to meet with the Professional Standards Committee to develop an action plan for improvement. This committee is made up of faculty members across SOE departments.

 

1g.2. How do candidates demonstrate that they are developing professional dispositions related to fairness and the belief that all students can learn

 

Teacher candidates demonstrate professional dispositions related to fairness and the belief that all students can learn through specified TIAI performance elements:

 

Indicator 12 - Communicates high expectations for learning to all students.

 

Indicator 17- Uses appropriate teaching strategies.

 

Indicator 18 - Provides learning experiences that accommodate differences in developmental and individual needs of diverse learners.

 

Indicator 28 - Demonstrates fairness and supportiveness in order achieve a positive interactive learning environment.

 

Indicator 17- Uses appropriate teaching strategies.

 

Indicator 25-Adjusts lessons according to individual student cues, professional reflections, and group responses.

 

Indicator 32-Uses assessment information to differentiate learning and utilizes a variety of formal and informal assessments.

 

Chart 1 exhibits the mean average by Performance Category for undergraduate candidates completing internship. The Student Learning Outcome as measured by the TIAI is that the mean score of the teacher candidate population will be a 3.85 or higher on indicators

 

A further description of the TIAI is presented below.

 

In June 2011, the faculty approved the expansion of the Professional Dispositions by the addition of two indicators: bias and fairness. The addition of these elements was based on recommendations made by presenters at the NCATE Summer Conference. The revised assessment tool will be implemented in August 2011. All students, undergraduate and graduate, signed the Professional Dispositions Instrument during the Admissions process.

 

 

Teacher Intern Assessment Instrument (TIAI)

 

Brief Description of the Assessment

The Teacher Intern Assessment Instrument will replace the 2009 Mississippi Student Teaching Assessment Instrument. This instrument will be used at all university and college teacher preparation programs across the state. Data will be aggregated across institutions as part of the Blue Ribbon Commission on the Redesign of Teacher Preparation Programs.

 

Alignment with NCTM Standards

The Teacher Intern Assessment Instrument measures a wide variety of teacher interns’ performance skills. The TIAI aligns with specific NCTM Standards. For example, under the Planning and Preparation section, teacher interns are evaluated on their demonstration and ability to select a variety of developmentally appropriate materials for lessons (aligning with NCTM Standard 1.3 – Knowledge of Mathematical Communication to Students; 1.4 – Knowledge of Mathematical Connections), to make instruction relevant and meaningful based on knowledge of students’ backgrounds, interests, experiences, and prior knowledge (aligning with NCTM Standard 16.3 Demonstrate the ability to increase students’ knowledge of mathematics), and to use a variety of strategies to effectively teach the various content areas (aligning with NCTM Standards 1.6 – Technology; 16.3 Field-Based Experiences; 1.7 Dispositions).

 

Within the Communication and Interaction section and the Teaching for Learning section of the TIAI, teacher interns are required to both establish “opportunities for communication with parents and/or guardians” and to use “family and/or community resources (human or material) in lessons to enhance student learning.” These requirements combined align with NCTM 16.3 Field-Based Experiences.

 

In the Teaching for Learning section of the TIAI, teacher interns are scored and provided feedback for exhibiting their ability to “use a variety of appropriate teaching strategies” and to “provide learning experiences that accommodate differences in developmental and individual needs of diverse learners (i.e., learning styles, multiple intelligences and enrichment/remedial needs)” (aligning with NCTM 16.3 Field-Based Experiences and 1.3 Communications).

 

Brief Analysis of Data Findings

Out of the 18 students, only 4 students fell below acceptable in any of the five categories. The majority of the students in each category maintained a 2.0 (acceptable) or above. For two of the three categories, Communication & Interaction and Assessment of Student Learning, everyone scored acceptable or target. In Management of Learning and Planning and Preparation only one in each of those categories scored in the higher end of the emerging scale. Two students scored very close to acceptable in the Teaching for Learning category. In Table 6, the overall means are provided. Everyone’s overall mean was a minimum of acceptable, lowest mean being a 2.12.

 

Chart 1 and Table 6 provide data concerning the overall means of the 18 students in EDU 483. The range for the overall means for the individual students is only .88, the lowest mean being a 2.12 and highest mean being a solid 3.00. For each of the categories in the TIAI, the minimum mean is 2.37 in Planning and Preparation. The highest mean of the five categories was in Learning Environment with a mean of 2.68 followed closely by Communication & Interaction being 2.65. The other two means show well above acceptable scores are Teaching for Learning (M =2.47) and Learning Environment (M = 2.51). The overall mean for all of the five categories is a more than respectable 2.52.

 

Chart 1

 

N=18

Scale: 1 = Emerging…3 = Target

 

Interpretation of How Data Provides Evidence for Meeting Standards

The TIAI is closely aligned with the NCTM standards. Candidates are monitored using the TIAI. The TIAI results are reviewed with the candidate by the assessor after each observation. If a candidate does not meet minimum standards on the first assessment using the TIAI criteria, then feedback is provided using data from the TIAI with the candidate. The candidate is then provided a second opportunity to ensure that the candidate is able to meet the minimum criteria to adequately meet the needs of his/her students. If a candidate does not meet the standards either time during the first internship process, he/she would have to attempt to work with his/her evaluator/mentor during a second attempt at an internship process to help once again remediate any shortcomings specifically observed and recorded on the previous TIAIs from the first internship process. This detailed data are most important in the ongoing program development to ensure that candidates are meeting minimum standards to better meet the needs of the students in the classroom. Data provided support that candidates are receiving rich real world experiences of performance, skills, knowledge, and dispositions of the individual teacher candidate.

 

 

1g.3. What data from key assessments indicate that candidates demonstrate the professional dispositions listed in 1.g.1 as they work with students, families, colleagues, and communities?

 

The Dispositional Evaluation was tested in the MAT Graduate Internship Program during 2009-2010 academic year. These interns were rated by their Cooperating Teachers. The Student Learning Outcome was set at 3.5 on a four point Likert scale. Chart 1 describes the data and shows a range of 3.76 (lowest) to 3.94 (highest). All dispositional category scores met the S.L.O. for the group.

 

Chart 1

Scale: 1 = lowest…4 = highest

Table 1 contains frequencies and descriptive information obtained from averaging all items from the questionnaire for each person (N = 51). Forty-seven interns had a mean score over 3.5 which met the S.L.O. Four students showed means not meeting the S.L.O. requirement.

 

Table 1

 

 

Score

Frequency

Percent

Cumulative Percent

2.67

1

1.96

1.96

3.33

1

1.96

3.92

3.42

2

3.92

7.84

3.58

2

3.92

11.76

3.67

1

1.96

13.73

3.75

8

15.69

29.41

3.83

5

9.80

39.22

4.00

31

60.78

100.00

Scale: 1 = lowest… 4 = highest

 

Interpretation of How Data Provides Evidence for Meeting Standards

This is a diagnostic instrument used in the early part of the internship in order to provide feedback and action plans by the supervising professor and the mentor. It is an important reflective instrument for each intern and will produce self-improvement based on specific dispositional needs. This instrument and its information meet the ACEI requirements for Instructional Standard 3 and Professionalism Standard 5.

Assessment Documentation

  • Professional Dispositions for Teaching Excellence (Revised Instrument for 2010-2011)

 

Professional Dispositions for Teaching Excellence

 

 

 

Areas of

Professional Dispositions

Novice 1]

Does not exhibit or rarely exhibits this disposition.

Emergent 2

Exhibits this disposition often but not consistently.

Mastery 3

Exhibits this disposition consistently.

Dependability and Reliability –shows responsible attendance, arrives punctually for class and teaching experiences, completes assignments on time, and is organized and prepared.

 

 

 

Respect – shows respect toward others, deals with frustrations, problems, and differences in opinion in mature ways.

 

 

 

Commitment and Initiative – takes assignments seriously, demonstrates commitment to learning and students rather than just completing assignments for a grade, and explores professional sources for new ideas.

 

 

 

Responsiveness –seeks and values constructive feedback from others, relates well with others.

 

 

 

Collaboration-helps create positive relationships in the university classroom and teaching experiences in schools, participates in the learning process by sharing diverse experiences and perspectives, participates productively in group activities, and establishes productive and professional relationships with professors and colleagues.

 

 

 

Open-Mindedness-Demonstrates a willingness to question both traditional and innovative practices in the quest for doing what is best for students and shows a willingness to be flexible when dealing with the uncertainty and complexity of educational issues.

 

 

 

Knowledgeable – Is aware of current educational issues, demonstrates an ability to illustrate and apply subject matter concepts.

 

 

 

Communication-Demonstrates effective communication, models standard English in writing and speaking, and expresses thought clearly and succinctly.

 

 

 

Confidentiality-reflects on information about students and specific classroom anecdotes in confidential and respectful ways and shares information only with those who need to know.

 

 

 

Academic Honesty-takes responsibility for producing independent, original work.

 

 

 

Appearance-Dresses for all teaching experiences by following the dress code established by the school site.

 

 

 

Teaching Effectiveness-Relates to and teaches students in ways that are developmentally appropriate, develops the ability to plan and to engage students in productive learning events that feature critical and insightful thinking, and demonstrates effective management skills.

 

 

 

Leadership Effectiveness- Ability to provide leadership skills when working with children and peers.

 

 

 

Total Score

 

 

 

 

 

 

1g.4. What do follow-up studies of graduates and employers indicate about graduates'

demonstration of professional dispositions? If survey data have not already been reported, what was the response rate? [If these survey data are included in a previously attached table, refer the reader to that attachment; otherwise, a table summarizing the results of follow-up studies related to professional dispositions could be attached at Prompt 1g.5 below.]

 

The Mississippi Annual Performance Report is the best evidence the unit has about the graduates’ demonstration of professional dispositions. When combining traditionally prepared teachers and alternate route teachers, the evidence indicates that principals all across the state are well satisfied with the professional dispositions, skills, and knowledge of their first year teachers who have graduated from Carey. See Tables 1.5 and 1.6.

 

 

Optional

 

1. What does your unit do particularly well related to Standard 1?

 

The accomplishment of the Blue Ribbon Commission Teacher Education Renewal Program was integral to the major design overhaul completed in 2008, implemented and evaluated during 2009-2011. We moved from being a little known private school in the state to a key player in the MDE and IHL. WCU was known for its conceptual framework and its teacher preparation designs. The unit’s statewide reputation moved the unit from a sleepy backwater position of recognition to being part of the state’s reconceptualization movement. Across the state, universities were recognizing the quality of Carey graduates and why they were sought after by principals. The unit’s local competitor, a university five times our size, realized that students were coming to Carey because of the quality of the undergraduate and graduate programs. Twenty years ago, the SOE had a reputation as a below average diploma mill. Those days are gone due to the huge accomplishments of the administrators and faculty members of this institution. The unit remains the largest school in the university representing 35% of the total population. The unit has become a respected part of the university community accepted by the other schools where in the past this was not always true.

 

 

 

2,000 characters

 

 

 

 

2. What research related to Standard 1 is being conducted by the unit or its faculty?

 

  1. 2008 American Institute of Higher Education 2nd International Conference

Atlantic City, New Jersey

September 24-26

 

Presentation: “Education in Rural Mississippi School Districts”

 

This study is the result of surveys mailed to selected superintendents of rural school district sin Mississippi between September 25 and October 24, 2006. Surveys were sent to fifty-three superintendents. Thirty-three superintendents responded. The study examines the challenges and concerns educational administrators face and have on a daily basis in these school districts. Specific concerns examined are funding, consolidation, technology, enrollment, homelessness, ESL students and percentages of high school graduates who pursue higher education and technical studies. Additionally, this study examines whether the schools in the selected school districts are successfully meeting accreditation levels 3-5 as set by the state.

 

  1. American Institute of Higher Education 4th International Conference

Colonial Williamsburg, Virginia

March 17-19, 2010

 

Presentation: “Perceptions of Interns (MAT’s) and Selected Traditional Graduate Students Regarding Multicultural Education”

 

This study was conducted at William Carey university during the Spring of the 2008-2009 academic school year. A total of 173 graduate students participated (master’s candidates in the School of Education): 95 traditional route students and 78 alternative route students (MAT Interns). Alternative route candidates may concentrate in one of two tracks: elementary or secondary education. Thirty-seven interns were concentrating in elementary education and 41 were concentrating in secondary education.

 

The purposes of the study were to determine:

  • interns and traditional route graduate students’ perceptions of what multicultural education is, how often multicultural education should be taught in k-12 classrooms, how minority students learn and how they should be taught;
  • if perceptions of elementary interns differ from the perceptions of secondary interns regarding what multicultural education is, how often it should be taught, how minority students learn and how they should be taught;
  • if perceptions of interns differ from the perceptions of traditional route students; and
  • What curriculum and programmatic changes if any, need to be made in the master’s program as a whole.

 

Nykela Jackson

 

“Digital Storytelling” (2008) presented at Mississippi Association of Gifted Children Conference

 

“Blogging Basics for the Elementary Classroom” (2009) presented at Mississippi Education Computing Association Conference

 

“Absolutely Free” (2009) presented at Mississippi Education Computing Association Conference

 

“The Enculturation of Dispositions Advantageous to Gifted Learners: An exploratory study of gifted education cohorts” (2009) presented at the National Association of Gifted Children Conference

 

“Using Technology for Differentiated Instruction” (2010) presented at Mississippi Education Computing Association Conference

 

Jackson, N. (2010, Winter). Shopping for grants. Mississippi Professional Educators Journal.

 

“Just Jing It” (2010) presented at Mississippi Education Computing Association Conference

 

“Parenting tips for gifted children” (2010) presented at the Lamar County Gifted Parent Association annual meeting

 

“Why become a teacher?” (2011) guest speaker for East Central Community College’s Student Teacher Organization