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School Department News

Art

Wednesday, April 6, 2016 - 8:46am
Dr. Read Diket, chair of the Department of Art and professor of art and education at William Carey University, was recently awarded the Maryl Fletcher de Jong Service Award by the Women’s Caucus of the National Art Education Association.
 
The award, which is given annually, honors an individual in the field of art education who has made noteworthy service contributions to art education as an advocate of equality for women and all people who encounter injustice. This individual gives outstanding service of community, state, national or international significance that contributes to eliminating discriminatory gender and other stereotyping practices for individuals and groups.
 
Diket was nominated for the award by Dr. David Burton of Virginia Commonwealth University with letters of support from Dr. Robert Sabol of Purdue University and Dr. Sheri Klein, the president of the Women’s Caucus. Their letters presented aspects of Diket’s service, including her presidency of the Seminar for Research in Art Education and of the Women’s Caucus. Diket has also served as president of several American Educational Research Association groups, including arts and education and brain, neuroscience and education.
 
Appropriate to the award, the letters also highlighted Diket’s 17 years of work as leader of the art education university consortium for secondary analysis and interpretation of National Assessment of Educational Progress visual arts from 1977, 2008 and 2016. Diket also contributes to an international dialogue on leadership and will publish a Taylor & Francis Group book chapter in 2016 on the ideology of thought leadership in social media.
 
In her acceptance speech, Diket spoke of Carey and the climate for service that has been such a strong component in its community for learning. She mentioned that kindness and empathy are mediums of respect that lead to positive outcomes for students, events and work at the university. From childhood, these components have figured into Diket’s orientation to the world.
 
Additionally, on April 2, Diket presented at Penn State University a paper on “Living the Vision.” The occasion was the 50th anniversary of the seminar that reoriented education in the arts at schools. Creativity needs for the race into space, needs for defining the disciplines in art and a spirit of collaboration despite consternation marked the original seminar. 
 
Diket showed through her reading of the event papers, and through autoethnography, that national ideas found positive expression in Mississippi schools, and further, that Mississippians in the arts are known to contribute leadership within the national discussion.
Monday, March 21, 2016 - 2:30pm
William Carey University and Oddfellows Gallery will present “The Art of Osmo Visuri,” an exhibit of watercolor paintings by the late Finnish artist, from April 14 through May 21 at the gallery in downtown Hattiesburg.
 
The opening reception for the exhibit will be held from 5:30 until 7:30 p.m. on April 14.
 
The exhibit, which consists of 26 paintings on loan from Mary Pyle of Gulfport, is currently on display at the Tradition campus in Biloxi through March 31. Pyle met Visuri, who was a professor at the University of Helsinki and a noted photographer and author, in 1988 through her work as a presidentially-appointed member of the National Council on Vocational Education.
 
Visuri would later visit Pyle and her husband, Jack, at their home. During his visit, the artist and the couple attempted to find a place to exhibit his paintings. After finding no success in this endeavor during his month-long stay, Visuri left his paintings with Pyle. The art was stored in a closet in Pyle’s home for 27 years until the Tradition campus exhibit this year.
 
The watercolors depict scenes of Visuri’s native country and prominently feature a lake and other landscapes near the artist’s home. A presentation about the artist’s life, along with Pyle’s memories of her friend, will be given, along with a video created by Visuri in the early 1990s explaining his unique techniques and settings.
 
Keijo Karjalainen, a cultural counselor from the Embassy of Finland in Washington, D.C., attended the opening reception for the Tradition exhibit on Feb. 25 and commented on Visuri’s prominence in his home country. Visuri was also known in Italy, where he operated a studio, and in Israel, where he authored several books about the Biblical Parables.
 
Oddfellows Gallery, located at 119 E. Front St., is open from 11 a.m. until 5 p.m. Thursday through Saturday. For more information on the exhibit, call (601) 318-6561.
Friday, March 11, 2016 - 10:23am
The William Carey University Department of Art hosted the seventh annual High School Art Scholarship Competition on March 5 at the Lucile Parker Gallery on the Hattiesburg campus.
 
Homeschool students and students from Picayune High School, South Jones High School and West Jones High School entered the contest, which awarded scholarships ranging in amounts from $500 to $2,000. Thirty-six students participated in the competition.
 
West Jones student Lauren Stevens won best of show for her work, “Posing in the Deep.” The first place winner was South Jones student Lauren Jones for “Midnight Slumber.” South Jones student Lizbeth Sanchez won second place for “Lady of the Forest” while Sarah Wedgeworth, a homeschool student, won third place for “Lizard Stalking Butterfly.”
 
Honorable mention winners included Paige Walters of West Jones, Kayla Yates of West Jones, Samantha Grafton of West Jones and Keegan Strickland of South Jones.
Tuesday, March 1, 2016 - 8:38am
William Carey University is presenting “The Art of Marie Hull,” a special exhibit of drawings and paintings by the famous Mississippi artist, through April 9 at Oddfellows Gallery at 119 E. Front St. in downtown Hattiesburg.
 
The closing reception for the exhibit will be held from 5 until 7 p.m. on April 9. Refreshments will be served and live music will be presented by the Carey Guitar Ensemble. The reception is a part of the Downtown Hattiesburg Art Walk.
 
Hull, born in Summit in 1890, was known not only for her oil paintings, drawings and watercolors, but also for her work as an art teacher. Identified as “an adventurous artist” in an article written by Marion Barnwell for the Mississippi Historical Society, Hull was known for her love of rich colors and her joke that she “liked any color as long as it was pink.” Hull was invited to exhibit her work at events including the Golden Gate Exposition in San Francisco and the New York World’s Fair.
 
She received numerous accolades for her work, including the Katherine Bellaman Prize in 1965 and the designation of “Marie Hull Day” by Gov. William Winter in October 1975, and continued to paint until her death at the age of 90 in 1980. Hull was also known for her close friendships with Sarah Gillespie, a Hattiesburg art collector and the namesake of Carey’s Gillespie Museum, and with Lucile Parker, former chair of the Carey art department and namesake of the Parker Gallery. 
 
Carey’s art collections include 40 works by Hull, all of which will be on display during the exhibit.
 
The Oddfellows Gallery is open from 11 a.m. until 5 p.m. Thursday through Saturday. For more information on the gallery, call (601) 544-5777. For more information on the university’s art collections, visit www.wmcarey.edu or call (601) 318-6051.
Friday, February 26, 2016 - 9:26pm
The William Carey University Tradition campus in Biloxi hosted the opening reception for “The Art of Osmo Visuri” exhibit on Feb. 25.
 
Twenty-six paintings by the late Finnish artist, which are on loan from Mary Pyle of Gulfport, are on display at the campus through March 31. Pyle met Visuri, who was a professor at the University of Helsinki and a noted photographer and author, in 1988 through her work as a presidentially-appointed member of the National Council on Vocational Education.
 
Visuri would later visit Pyle and her husband, Jack, at their home. During his visit, the artist and the couple attempted to find a place to exhibit his paintings. After finding no success in this endeavor during his month-long stay, Visuri left the paintings with Pyle. The art has been stored in a closet in Pyle’s home for 27 years and is now on display for the first time for local audiences.
 
Keijo Karjalainen, a cultural counselor from the Embassy of Finland in Washington, D.C., attended the reception and gave brief remarks during a presentation about the artist’s life. Visuri, who died in January 2013, was a noted artist in his home country, according to the embassy representative. Visuri was also known in Italy, where he operated a studio, and in Israel, where he authored several books about the Biblical Parables.
 
The presentation included a video created by Visuri in the early 1990s to explain the settings of his paintings and his particular techniques. His watercolors depict scenes of Visuri’s native country and prominently feature a lake and landscapes near the artist’s home.
 
The exhibit is on display in the lobby of the A Building on the Tradition campus. It may be viewed during regular operating hours from 9 a.m. until 6 p.m. Monday through Thursday and from 8 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. on Friday. The exhibit will be closed for spring break from March 14-18.
 
For more information on the exhibit or for directions to the campus, call (228) 702-1775 or email Tracy Williams, director of the Tradition art program, at twilliams@wmcarey.edu.