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School Department News

Biological Sciences

Tuesday, April 21, 2015 - 10:15am
The William Carey University College of Osteopathic Medicine hosted the 2015 Research Symposium on April 17 with Dr. Stefanie Jeffrey of Stanford University as the keynote speaker.
 
Dr. Jeffrey, Stanford's chief of surgical oncology research and the John and Marva Warnock professor, joined three Carey faculty members in presenting lectures throughout the symposium. Her lecture topic was "Liquid Biopsy in Cancer." Following Dr. Jeffrey's lecture, Dr. Italo Subbarao, associate dean of pre-clinical sciences at the Carey College of Osteopathic Medicine, presented "Using Twitter Effectively to Prevent Injury and Deaths from Disasters."
 
Dr. Tyler Hodges, assistant professor of biological sciences, presented "Bioactive Surfaces and Their Applications," followed by Dr. Maude McGill, instructor of nursing, presenting "Increasing Dietary Phosphorous Knowledge and Adherence Among Adult Hemodialysis Patients through Peer Mentoring."
 
The lectures were presented free of charge and open to the public. Prior to the lectures, Carey students and faculty members from the medical college, the School of Nursing and the Master of Biomedical Science program competed in a research poster contest. The contest featured four categories, including graduate, medical, nursing and undergraduate. 
 
First place winners in the graduate category were Danielle Hagler and Justina Boles, students in the biomedical science program, for their poster, "Antimicrobial Peptides for Pathogen Reduction." Winners in the medical category were David Buford, Nabil Baddour, Allina Espinosa, Iben McCormick-Ricket and Dr. Subbarao for "An Evidence-Based Review of Resilience in Communities in the Face of Oil Spill Disasters."
 
Winning the nursing category was Denise Hancock, assistant professor of nursing, for "Leaving Academia: Work Experiences and Career Decisions of Former Nurse Faculty." Winning the undergraduate category was Pearl Ugwu-Dike, a senior biology major, for "Cross-Regulation Between the Notch Signaling Pathway and the Activin Signaling Pathway in the Ovary."
Monday, November 17, 2014 - 2:25pm
Dr. Julie May, an associate professor of biological sciences at William Carey University and a food blogger, recently published a cookbook, Menu Musings of a Modern American Mom, through Indigo River Publishing.
 
The full-color cookbook, published in October, is 342 pages in length and contains 152 recipes. The recipes are family favorites that prove to be quick and easy to follow. The book offers unique, interactive features, with each recipe having its own QR code that can be scanned with a smartphone or tablet. The code redirects readers to Dr. May’s blog, also known as Menu Musings, where they can see complete step-by-step photos and video.
 
The blog was started in 2010 because Dr. May wanted to share easy recipes with her busy friends. The blog is now the fastest-growing food blog in the country, according to Indigo River Publishing President Adam Tillinghast.
 
“It’s unlike any other blog on the web right now,” said Tillinghast. “She just passed eight million views on her site; it’s going to be close to 10 million before the end of the year. It’s truly a rising star in the food world.”
 
Dr. May’s recipes have been featured in the online edition of Glamour, Taste of Home’s Simple & Delicious and will appear in the December/January edition of eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI. Her food blog has an international following with around eight million views and is known for its detailed recipes and step-by-step photographs. It is also known because of Dr. May’s penchant for getting the entire family involved in the cooking process, especially children.
 
Additionally, her recipes have appeared in the Blossman Gas Blue Notes Newsletter, which is distributed to 60,000 households in a 12-state area. Dr. May has also appeared in cooking commercials for Ingles Markets, a grocery store chain in the Southeast with over 200 locations covering six states.
 
Dr. May said she authored the cookbook because of the tremendous success of her blog, a demand from her readers and her desire to get families to cook together.
 
“I grew up with my mother reading cookbooks at night,” said Dr. May. “So, for me, a cookbook needed to be more than just a listing of ingredients and a method…there needed to be stories of how the recipes got there, where the food came from and little tidbits of information for people to savor and enjoy.”
 
Dr. May has been on the WCU faculty since 2005. She earned her bachelor’s degree in occupational therapy at the Louisiana State University Medical Center in 1995 and a Ph.D. in biological sciences from the University of Southern Mississippi in 2004 with a concentration in cellular and molecular neuroscience, focusing on the molecular aspects of Alzheimer’s disease, oxidative stress and aging. She worked for a year in postdoctoral research at Pennington Biomedical Research in Baton Rouge, La., focusing on human clinical research and studying physiological changes due to obesity before joining the WCU faculty.
 
She resides in Hattiesburg with her husband, Gregg. She has four children and two stepsons.
 
The book may be purchased via www.menumusingsbook.com, via Dr. May’s blog at www.menumusings.blogspot.com, or through Amazon.com. 
Wednesday, October 29, 2014 - 3:33pm
Dr. Julie May, an associate professor of biological sciences at William Carey University and a food blogger, recently published a cookbook, Menu Musings of a Modern American Mom, through Indigo River Publishing.
 
The full-color cookbook, published in October, is 342 pages in length and contains 152 recipes. The recipes are family favorites that prove to be quick and easy to follow. The book offers unique, interactive features, with each recipe having its own QR code that can be scanned with a smartphone or tablet. The code redirects readers to Dr. May’s blog, also known as Menu Musings, where they can see complete step-by-step photos and video.
 
Dr. May’s recipes have been featured in the online edition of Glamour, Taste of Home’s Simple & Delicious and will appear in the December/January edition of eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI. Her food blog has an international following with around eight million views and is known for its detailed recipes and step-by-step photographs. It is also known because of Dr. May’s penchant for getting the entire family involved in the cooking process, especially children.
 
Additionally, her recipes have appeared in the Blossman Gas Blue Notes Newsletter, which is distributed to 60,000 households in a 12-state area. Dr. May has also appeared in cooking commercials for Ingles Markets, a grocery store chain in the Southeast with over 200 locations covering six states.
 
Dr. May said she authored the cookbook because of the tremendous success of her blog, a demand from her readers and her desire to get families to cook together.
 
“I grew up with my mother reading cookbooks at night,” said Dr. May. “So, for me, a cookbook needed to be more than just a listing of ingredients and a method…there needed to be stories of how the recipes got there, where the food came from and little tidbits of information for people to savor and enjoy.”
 
Dr. May has been on the WCU faculty since 2005. She earned her bachelor’s degree in occupational therapy at the Louisiana State University Medical Center in 1995 and a Ph.D. in biological sciences from the University of Southern Mississippi in 2004 with a concentration in cellular and molecular neuroscience, focusing on the molecular aspects of Alzheimer’s disease, oxidative stress and aging. She worked for a year in postdoctoral research at Pennington Biomedical Research in Baton Rouge, La., focusing on human clinical research and studying physiological changes due to obesity before joining the WCU faculty.
 
She resides in Hattiesburg with her husband, Gregg. She has four children and two stepsons.
 
The book may be purchased via www.menumusingsbook.com, via Dr. May’s blog at www.menumusings.blogspot.com, or through Amazon.com. 
Monday, April 7, 2014 - 10:41am

Hattiesburg, Miss., April 7, 2014 - Pictured are William Carey University’s (left to right) Dr. Tyler Hodges, assistant professor of biological sciences, and Dr. Michael McNatt, assistant professor of chemistry and physics, who will present lectures at WCU’s Common Ground coffee shop for the NASA DEVELOP program Science Café on April 15 at 6 p.m. Dr. Hodges will present a lecture titled, “Marine Bacteria as a Source of New Pharmaceuticals,” and Dr. McNatt will present a lecture titled, “Finding Glomalin, Sequestering Carbon in Healthy Agricultural Soils and the Environment.” The NASA DEVELOP program is an interdisciplinary research program where applied science research projects are conducted under the guidance of NASA and partner science advisors. Students and the public are invited to attend.