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School Department News

School of Natural and Behavioral Sciences

Tuesday, January 27, 2015 - 8:04am
Wednesday, October 29, 2014 - 3:33pm
Dr. Julie May, an associate professor of biological sciences at William Carey University and a food blogger, recently published a cookbook, Menu Musings of a Modern American Mom, through Indigo River Publishing.
 
The full-color cookbook, published in October, is 342 pages in length and contains 152 recipes. The recipes are family favorites that prove to be quick and easy to follow. The book offers unique, interactive features, with each recipe having its own QR code that can be scanned with a smartphone or tablet. The code redirects readers to Dr. May’s blog, also known as Menu Musings, where they can see complete step-by-step photos and video.
 
Dr. May’s recipes have been featured in the online edition of Glamour, Taste of Home’s Simple & Delicious and will appear in the December/January edition of eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI. Her food blog has an international following with around eight million views and is known for its detailed recipes and step-by-step photographs. It is also known because of Dr. May’s penchant for getting the entire family involved in the cooking process, especially children.
 
Additionally, her recipes have appeared in the Blossman Gas Blue Notes Newsletter, which is distributed to 60,000 households in a 12-state area. Dr. May has also appeared in cooking commercials for Ingles Markets, a grocery store chain in the Southeast with over 200 locations covering six states.
 
Dr. May said she authored the cookbook because of the tremendous success of her blog, a demand from her readers and her desire to get families to cook together.
 
“I grew up with my mother reading cookbooks at night,” said Dr. May. “So, for me, a cookbook needed to be more than just a listing of ingredients and a method…there needed to be stories of how the recipes got there, where the food came from and little tidbits of information for people to savor and enjoy.”
 
Dr. May has been on the WCU faculty since 2005. She earned her bachelor’s degree in occupational therapy at the Louisiana State University Medical Center in 1995 and a Ph.D. in biological sciences from the University of Southern Mississippi in 2004 with a concentration in cellular and molecular neuroscience, focusing on the molecular aspects of Alzheimer’s disease, oxidative stress and aging. She worked for a year in postdoctoral research at Pennington Biomedical Research in Baton Rouge, La., focusing on human clinical research and studying physiological changes due to obesity before joining the WCU faculty.
 
She resides in Hattiesburg with her husband, Gregg. She has four children and two stepsons.
 
The book may be purchased via www.menumusingsbook.com, via Dr. May’s blog at www.menumusings.blogspot.com, or through Amazon.com. 
Tuesday, September 16, 2014 - 1:06pm

The Greater Pinebelt Community Foundation has awarded William Carey University $20,000 to benefit programs that assist adults with intellectual disabilities.

The $20,000 grant is divided into two $10,000 grants. One of the grants is for “Harnessing Adults’ Full Potential Through Music Therapy,” which provides music therapy services to adults with intellectual disabilities at day rehabilitation centers. The goal of the program is to increase acquisition of skill building and to promote activities for daily living.

Music therapy students work closely with Nicole Ribet, a music therapist with Ribet Rhythms Music Therapy Services and a 2013 graduate of WCU, to help individuals with development disabilities gain social skills and independence, said Jim Pierce, assistant professor of music therapy at WCU.

“Students can work with clients and interact with them, providing benefits to both parties,” said Pierce. “These grants personify the good local communities can do when they work together.”

The second $10,000 grant will go to the WCU Quality of Life Project, which pairs students with adults with intellectual disabilities for recreational and educational projects. The project, now in its fourth year, allows for new experiences for both the client and the student, said Dr. Paul Cotten, project director.

Pennie Young, a case manager with Ellisville State School who has worked closely with Cotten on the project, said the grants make a world of difference in the lives of clients. Clients and students together attend multiple outings each year, including to Carey Dinner Theatre, local concerts and movies, among other activities. The group also takes an out-of-town trip once a year, such as to Graceland and the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis or to the aquarium in New Orleans.

“Because of the efforts of the Foundation and of William Carey University, we can go on trips that do enhance the quality of life of those we work with,” said Young.

The grants are awarded from the Ann Morris Memorial Fund, which was set up to enrich the quality of life of intellectually challenged adults. The Foundation exists to strengthen communities by connecting charitably minded people to causes that matter the most to them.

Wednesday, July 16, 2014 - 2:51pm

The William Carey University Tradition Campus counseling program has received a National Board for Certified Counselors & Affiliates (NBCC) grant to assist in initial Council for Accreditation of Counseling & Related Educational Programs (CACREP) accreditation.

The grant, awarded to the program’s clinical mental health and school counseling tracks, was one of 15 given from an applicant pool of 59 institutions nationally.

“We were honored to receive this funding that will pay for each of our remaining phases of accreditation and will include funding for planned site visits sometime in the spring of 2015,” said Dr. Carol Jones, director of psychology and graduate counseling at the Tradition Campus.

The grant application was evaluated on criteria including the general understanding of the CACREP process; the feasibility of the program’s timeline, goals and challenges; and the potential of the program to graduate counselors who will serve underserved populations in need.

Tuesday, October 15, 2013 - 4:12pm

Hattiesburg, Miss., October 15, 2013 - William Carey University’s Dr. Kelly Caffery, instructor of biology and psychology, will be holding an Enrichment Day at the Hattiesburg Zoo for her animal behavior class on October 19 at 11a.m. They will be making and presenting enrichment items to several different animals at the zoo including the jaguar, tiger, servals, lemurs, and other primates.

“One of the activities includes making a deer out of cardboard and stuffing it with meat to present to the tiger,” Dr. Caffery said. “Last time I did this activity with my animal behavior students the tiger was especially interesting to watch!”

The public is invited to attend and observe. Admission to the zoo is $5 for adults, $4 for military/seniors, $3 for children 2-12, and free for children under 2. They are open 10 a.m.- 4 p.m.

“I think this will be a fun activity for my students, beneficial to the animals, and interesting for the public as well,” Dr. Caffery said. “I think anyone with children will especially enjoy watching the animals interact with the enrichment we make for them.”

For more information about the Animal Behavior Enrichment day, contact Dr. Caffery at (601) 318-6780 or kcaffery@wmcarey.edu. For more information about the Hattiesburg Zoo, call (601) 545-4576 or zooeducator@hattiesburg.org.