School Department News

School of Nursing

Thursday, July 30, 2015 - 11:05am
William Carey University will hold commencement ceremonies on Friday, August 7 and Saturday, August 8 in Smith Auditorium on the Hattiesburg campus.
The Friday ceremony will begin at 7 p.m. for doctoral candidates from the School of Education and the Fail School of Nursing as well as Specialist in Education candidates from both the Hattiesburg and Tradition campuses. The speaker will be Dr. Chuck Benigno, superintendent of the Laurel School District.
Three ceremonies will be held on Saturday, beginning with the 9:30 a.m. ceremony for graduate students from the Hattiesburg campus. The speaker is Jermaine Brown, principal of Hattiesburg High School.
The second Saturday ceremony will begin at 1 p.m. for undergraduate students from the Hattiesburg campus. The speaker is Dr. Steven Bishop, president of Southwest Mississippi Community College in McComb.
The final Saturday ceremony will begin at 4 p.m. for graduate and undergraduate students from the Tradition campus. Dr. Argile Smith, pastor of Parkway Baptist Church in Biloxi and former interim president of Louisiana College, will be the speaker.
For more information on Carey’s commencement ceremonies, contact the registrar’s office at (601) 318-6051.
Tuesday, April 21, 2015 - 10:15am
The William Carey University College of Osteopathic Medicine hosted the 2015 Research Symposium on April 17 with Dr. Stefanie Jeffrey of Stanford University as the keynote speaker.
Dr. Jeffrey, Stanford's chief of surgical oncology research and the John and Marva Warnock professor, joined three Carey faculty members in presenting lectures throughout the symposium. Her lecture topic was "Liquid Biopsy in Cancer." Following Dr. Jeffrey's lecture, Dr. Italo Subbarao, associate dean of pre-clinical sciences at the Carey College of Osteopathic Medicine, presented "Using Twitter Effectively to Prevent Injury and Deaths from Disasters."
Dr. Tyler Hodges, assistant professor of biological sciences, presented "Bioactive Surfaces and Their Applications," followed by Dr. Maude McGill, instructor of nursing, presenting "Increasing Dietary Phosphorous Knowledge and Adherence Among Adult Hemodialysis Patients through Peer Mentoring."
The lectures were presented free of charge and open to the public. Prior to the lectures, Carey students and faculty members from the medical college, the School of Nursing and the Master of Biomedical Science program competed in a research poster contest. The contest featured four categories, including graduate, medical, nursing and undergraduate. 
First place winners in the graduate category were Danielle Hagler and Justina Boles, students in the biomedical science program, for their poster, "Antimicrobial Peptides for Pathogen Reduction." Winners in the medical category were David Buford, Nabil Baddour, Allina Espinosa, Iben McCormick-Ricket and Dr. Subbarao for "An Evidence-Based Review of Resilience in Communities in the Face of Oil Spill Disasters."
Winning the nursing category was Denise Hancock, assistant professor of nursing, for "Leaving Academia: Work Experiences and Career Decisions of Former Nurse Faculty." Winning the undergraduate category was Pearl Ugwu-Dike, a senior biology major, for "Cross-Regulation Between the Notch Signaling Pathway and the Activin Signaling Pathway in the Ovary."
Thursday, April 16, 2015 - 5:06pm
As a result of strong growth in health-related programs, the William Carey University Board of Trustees recently approved the creation of the College of Health Sciences.
The new academic unit will include several existing programs at the university, including the School of Nursing, the Department of Physical Therapy, the health information management program and the health education and administration program. Dr. Janet Williams, dean of Carey's nursing school, will serve as dean of the new college.
The establishment of the new college comes on the heels of strong enrollment growth in the nursing school and the establishment of the doctoral program in physical therapy in 2014. The School of Nursing has seen an enrollment increase of 18 percent since 2010 on the Mississippi campuses, located in Hattiesburg and Biloxi, with a continued increase expected for fall 2015. A satellite location in Slidell, La., is also seeing positive enrollment numbers.
In 2012, the nursing school introduced the administration and education doctoral program following the Washington, D.C.-based Institute of Medicine's recommendation that universities double the number of nurses with a doctorate by 2020. Two years later, Carey graduated 21 doctoral nursing students, a number more than triple the six doctoral nursing graduates throughout Mississippi in the previous year.
There are currently 72 students enrolled in the doctoral program, with 27 anticipated to graduate this year and another 40 in 2016. The health information management program, which started in 2014 and offers a bachelor's degree, will also graduate its first class of 26 students in 2015. Another new program started in 2014, the Master of Business Administration/Master of Science in nursing dual degree, is also seeing growth.
Carey is also readying the physical therapy doctoral program for its first students. The program was established by the Carey Board of Trustees in 2014 and is seeking accreditation by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education. Fundraising is currently underway to provide for startup costs, including renovation of the program's classrooms in Thomas Business Building. A total of $1 million has been raised out of a projected need of $1.5 million.
Students will be eligible to begin pre-physical therapy studies in the fall. The first doctoral class consisting of 30 students is expected to be admitted in fall 2016. The physical therapy program will be the second of its kind in the state at a time when the need for physical therapists is growing at a rapid rate. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics recently predicted the job growth in the near future in physical therapy to be 36 percent compared to a predicted increase of 20 percent for other medical fields.
Carey's new programs are designed to meet needs around the state, said Dr. Williams.
"We are interested in providing for students educationally sound and innovative methods to increase the educational level of health care workers in our state, which will subsequently have a positive effect on health care available to the citizens of our state," she said.
Carey has a rich history of providing for medical needs in Mississippi and neighboring states. In 1969, Carey acquired the Mather School of Nursing in New Orleans and was approved to offer the bachelor's degree in nursing for the first time at the Hattiesburg campus. The degree soon expanded to Carey's then-Gulf Coast campus in Gulfport, which was relocated to the Tradition Planned Community near Biloxi following Hurricane Katrina. The master's degree in nursing was added in 2003. In 2007, the Carey Board of Trustees authorized construction of a College of Osteopathic Medicine, the second medical school in the state. The medical college opened in 2010 and graduated its first class of students in 2014.
With consistent growth and the founding of the College of Health Sciences, the future seems bright for Carey's health-related programs, especially as another new program looms on the horizon. Carey administrators and the Office for Advancement are currently working to raise funds for a school of pharmacy at the Tradition campus. The proposed pharmacy school would be the second of its kind in the state and would help combat a critical shortage of pharmacists in Mississippi. Administrators anticipate a need for $4 million in startup costs along with an additional $12-15 million in construction funds for facilities for the school.
The largest gift in Carey history, $1.1 million, was given to the institution by Joe F. Sanderson Jr., chairman and chief executive officer of Sanderson Farms, and his wife Kathy, with $1 million of the gift benefitting the pharmacy school and $100,000 applied to the physical therapy program. Additional gifts, including a $125,000 gift from the Leo W. Seal Family Foundation, have also been received for the pharmacy school.
A master's degree is also being planned for the health administration and education program, which helps health care workers who are licensed, registered or certified increase their educational level for teaching or becoming administrators.
"As a university, Carey is dedicated to meet the needs of those around us," said Dr. Williams. "We are very fortunate because we have a visionary president who encourages us to be innovative and meet those needs."
For more information about Carey's health-related programs, visit or call (601) 318-6478. To contribute to fundraising efforts for the pharmacy and physical therapy programs, visit or call (601) 318-6542.
Friday, March 6, 2015 - 3:03pm
The William Carey University Fail School of Nursing was named the School of Nursing of the Year and Dr. Janet Williams, Carey’s dean of nursing, was named School of Nursing Administrator of the Year by the Mississippi Nurses’ Association during the annual Nightingale Awards Gala in Jackson on March 2.
The Nightingale Awards are sponsored by the association and the Mississippi Nurses’ Foundation to honor outstanding nurses and health care professionals. The awards are known as the “Academy Awards” of quality service in the nursing and health care industry.
The awards recognize the Fail School of Nursing’s dedication to providing relevant educational programs which meet needs in the state and also recognize the school’s strong admission growth. The nursing school, first approved to offer classes in 1969, has expanded significantly in recent years and operates on both the main campus in Hattiesburg, the Tradition campus in Biloxi and at a Slidell, La., off campus site.
In addition to offering the nursing bachelor’s degree, the nursing master’s degree with multiple specialty areas and post-master’s degree program options in nursing education, the School of Nursing added in 2012 a doctorate in nursing education and administration and a bachelor’s degree in health information management. A dual master’s degree in nursing and business administration was added in 2014.
The new programs are just one part of the nursing school’s continued growth. Dr. Williams and the nursing school faculty have also worked to improve existing programs and keep the school at the cutting edge of trends in health care education. School leaders also continually assess needs in the state and work to provide for those needs.
An example of providing for needs is found in the establishment of the nursing doctorate, created following a 2010 Institute of Medicine report recommending universities double the number of nurses with a doctorate by 2020.
In the 2012-2013 academic year, only six Mississippi nurses earned doctorates. The Carey nursing school graduated an inaugural class of 21 students from its nursing doctorate program in 2014. Twenty-eight more doctoral students are projected to receive their degrees in August 2015 followed by 35 students in 2016.
The Nightingale Awards also recognize the vision of Dr. Williams and her ability to implement and manage strong programs. Dr. Williams has been with the Fail School of Nursing for 25 years and has served for four years as dean. She was appointed in 2014 by Gov. Phil Bryant to serve on the Mississippi State Board of Nursing.
For more information on Carey's nursing school, visit or call (601) 318-6478.