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School Department News

WCUCOM News and Events

Friday, April 10, 2015 - 8:45am
The Mississippi Legislature recently named April 19-25 as National Osteopathic Medicine Week in Mississippi and the William Carey University College of Osteopathic Medicine has planned events to observe the special week.
 
Activities will begin on Friday, April 17 with the medical college's Research Symposium in conjunction with the University Lecture Series. The keynote speaker is Dr. Stefanie Jeffrey, chief of surgical oncology research and the John and Marva Warnock professor at Stanford University, presenting "Liquid Biopsy in Cancer" from noon until 1 p.m. in Lecture Hall 1 of the medical complex's Academic Building. Lunch will be provided.
 
Following the keynote, Carey faculty members will present lectures throughout the afternoon. Dr. Italo Subbarao, associate dean for pre-clinical sciences at the medical college, will present "Using Twitter Effectively to Prevent Injury and Deaths from Disasters" from 2 until 2:30 p.m. followed by Dr. Tyler Hodges, assistant professor of biological sciences, presenting from 2:30 until 3 p.m. "Bioactive Surfaces and Their Applications."
 
The final speaker will be Dr. Maude McGill, instructor of nursing, presenting from 3 until 3:30 p.m. "Increasing Dietary Phosphorous Knowledge and Adherence Among Adult Hemodialysis Patients through Peer Mentoring." The faculty lectures will be held in the Kresge Room of Thomas Business Building.
 
On Monday, April 20 from 4:30 until 6:30 p.m., there will be a community reception in the Academic Building and an open house of the medical college facilities on the Hattiesburg campus. There will also be a brief introduction into the field of osteopathic medicine and an update on the medical college's status and future plans as well as tours of the medical complex. Light refreshments will be served.
 
On Wednesday, April 22, the medical college will host a National ShaDO event. On this date, area students interested in exploring osteopathic medicine can shadow one of Carey's osteopathic medical students. Interested students must register by 5 p.m. on Friday, April 17. For more information, contact Rachel Blancett, president of Carey's Student Osteopathic Medical Association, at rblancett173567@student.wmcarey.edu.
 
On Thursday, April 23, the Medical Assurance Company of Mississippi will present "Think Again," a discussion about recent medical malpractice cases and legal theories regarding medical professional liability, from noon until 1 p.m. in Lecture Hall 2 of the Academic Building. The company's presenters will be Robert Jones, president and chief executive officer, and Dr. Todd Savell, claims manager.
 
On Monday, April 27, Dr. Robert Good, an osteopathic physician who is board certified in internal medicine and is a former president of the American College of Osteopathic Internists, will present "Climbing the Mountain of Medical Education" from noon until 1 p.m. in Lecture Hall 2 of the Academic Building. Dr. Good's lecture will be a discussion of internal medicine and other subspecialties. Lunch will be provided and a textbook raffle will be held for those in attendance.
 
All events are free and open to the public. Pre-registration is required only for the National ShaDO event. For more information, contact the College of Osteopathic Medicine at (601) 318-6610.
Friday, March 27, 2015 - 8:37am
Barinder Singh, a second-year student at the William Carey University College of Osteopathic Medicine from McGehee, Ark., recently won an honorable mention for her poem “Clearing” at the 33rd annual William Carlos Williams Poetry Competition.
 
The competition is sponsored by the Department of Family and Community Medicine at Northeast Ohio Medical University in Rootstown, Ohio. It is open to students attending allopathic or osteopathic medical schools in the United States and Canada.
 
Each year, hundreds of entries are submitted to the competition and go through a preliminary screening by the Wick Poetry Center at Kent State University. The final judge for the competition is Dr. Richard Berlin, a psychiatrist and poet from the University of Massachusetts Medical School.
Tuesday, March 10, 2015 - 3:53pm
The Mississippi Legislature, in a concurrent resolution approved on March 9, recognized the work of the William Carey University College of Osteopathic Medicine and named the week of April 19-25 as National Osteopathic Medicine Week in Mississippi.
 
The resolution, sponsored by Sens. John Polk of District 44 and Billy Hudson of District 45, recognizes Carey’s medical college, the first school of osteopathic medicine in the state, and its work in educating future osteopathic physicians and in providing various services to the community. The resolution also recognizes the 440 osteopathic physicians currently practicing in Mississippi.
 
The resolution specifically mentions the medical college’s new osteopathic manipulative treatment clinic, opened January 26 on the Hattiesburg campus. The clinic serves Carey students, employees and their families and has introduced the principles of osteopathic medicine to the community.
 
The resolution also mentions the college’s various outreach efforts, including holding health fairs at local events; leading activities in elementary schools for National Physiology Understanding Week; volunteering at health care clinics in impoverished areas of the Mississippi Delta; leading exercise classes and activities at local retirement homes; raising money and awareness for the American Heart Association; assisting with cleanup efforts at Gordon’s Creek in Hattiesburg; and helping build homes for Habitat for Humanity.
 
In addition to outreach efforts, the resolution also recognizes the attendance of medical college personnel and students at the recent Osteopathic Medical Conference and Exposition in Seattle, where Alexis Cates, a fourth-year student from Mandeville, La., was awarded the Nichols LEAD Scholar Award. The award, given by the American Osteopathic Foundation, was presented to Cates for leadership, excellence, achievement and dedication in the classroom and in the community.
 
Dr. James Turner, dean of the medical college, was on hand to receive the resolution, along with members of the student body and associate deans Dr. Robert Bateman and Dr. Italo Subbarao. Dr. Ed Williams, executive director of the Mississippi Osteopathic Medical Association, was also present.
Friday, February 13, 2015 - 8:22am
William Carey University students, employees and their families are benefiting from the services of an on-campus osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) clinic operated by faculty members from the College of Osteopathic Medicine.
 
The clinic, located in Mary Ross Hall on the Hattiesburg campus, utilizes OMT procedures to diagnose, treat and prevent illness or injury. OMT involves hands-on care from osteopathic physicians, including the movement of muscles and joints using techniques including stretching and gentle pressure. The treatment, used to treat ailments such as back pain or migraines, can ease pain, promote healing and increase overall mobility.
 
Dr. James Turner, dean of Carey’s medical college, said the goal in opening this clinic is to introduce osteopathic medicine and its techniques to the Carey community as part of the college’s outreach efforts. The college’s mission is to educate osteopathic physicians who will be committed to serving the health care needs of all individuals with special attention directed to the medically underserved populations of the state and region.
 
In addition to the clinic, the medical college also reaches out beyond its curriculum and physical walls by setting up health fairs for local events; leading activities in elementary schools for National Physiology Understanding Week; volunteering at health care clinics in the impoverished areas of the Mississippi Delta; leading exercise classes and activities at local retirement homes; raising money and awareness for the American Heart Association; assisting with cleanup efforts at Gordon’s Creek in Hattiesburg; and helping build homes for Habitat for Humanity.
 
The new clinic, which opened January 26, is operated under the supervision of Dr. Richard Sloan, assistant professor of clinical sciences. Initially, the clinic will be open from 12:30 until 4:30 p.m. each Monday. Future plans include expansion of operation times and patients treated.
 
For more information on the Carey COM, visit www.wmcarey.edu/com.